prix cialis 20mg suisse 
http://www.apb-france.fr/?page...-pharmacie 
cialis sur ordonnance 
    http://anthropology.uga.edu/in...enu=175119 generic clobetasol ciprofloxacin toxicity
mas 
toile 
gehe zu 
klicken Sie hier 
go to page click photoshop cs5 purchase autocad lt for mac 2015
Home » Alphabetical Listings

Alphabetical Listings – A

25 April 2010 192,850 views 2 Comments

Articles on Fragrance-free programs & industry’s stand in Halifax

Assaulted by fragrances

Assurances by fragrance industry of safety of products


AAFA | Acceptable Risk | Access | Accommodation


Acronyms | ACT | Acupressure | Acupuncture | ADA | ADD


Addicted | Addison’s | Adhesives | ADPSR | Ads | AIDS


Aggression & fragrances | Agriculture | AHA


Air | Air “Fresheners” | Air Pollution | Air Purifiers | Air Quality


Alcohol | ALA | AllerCare | Allergy | Alternative Care | Alzheimer’s

AMA | Amalgam | American… | American PIE

Anaphylaxis | Anderson Labs | Animal | Another Perspective | Anthrax


Antibacterial | Antibiotic/Antimicrobial | Ants


Architecture | Arctic | Arkansas Moms | Aromatherapy


Arsenic | Art/Supplies | Arthritis | Articles


As You Sow | Asbestos | Nicholas A. Ashford | Ask Annie | Aspartame


Assaulted | Assurances | Asthma | ATSDR | Attention Deficit

Attitudinal Barriers | Australia | Autism | Automatic dispensers

AVOID Fragrances | Awareness2000



Clicking on the alpha character, at the top, will take you to another page of links.

Clicking on the QuickClicks will speed you through this page. But do take a moment to scroll above and below your selected topic, as these few key words do not an index make.

Remember, you can also use your browser’s FIND command!









Outbound to EHN’s Government LINKS


EHN does not endorse any product, service or therapy and none is intended or implied.

We bring you this information as a service.



A

  • AAAAI (American Academy of Allergy and Immunology)

    http://www.aaaai.org/



    • “Asthmatics’ reactions to common perfumes” — scroll down

      Hmmmm, what a difference a year makes!

      At least we’ve acknowledgement that fragrances trigger asthma. — barb

      “SAN DIEGOãFragrances are often cited by asthmatics as initiating or exacerbating
      asthma; and different fragrances vary in the number and intensity of allergic reactions
      they cause, researchers said today at the AAAAI Annual Meeting. …”

      http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2000/03/000304.html


    • Idiopathic environmental intolerances; AAAAI Board of Directors

      JACI, Vol. 103, January 1999, pp. 36-40

      Don’t you think it’s time these folks looked at the toxic brew of modern synthetic

      fragrances? As synthetic scents are irritants and sensitizers, that sets folks up for severe
      reactions to Mother Nature’s fragrances too. Now that I’m no longer in a toxic workplace,
      — loaded with synthetic scents in personal care and cleaning/maintenance products —

      I can again enjoy Mother Nature’s bounty. My “allergic” reactions went with the

      absence of synthetic scents. — barb

      http://www.aaaai.org/professional/physicianreference/positionstatements/ps35.stm


    • Environmental allergen avoidance in allergic asthma

      JACI, Vol. 103, February 1999, pp. 203-5

    • Ad Hoc Working Group on Environmental Allergens and Asthma

      http://www.aaaai.org/professional/physicianreference/positionstatements/ps36.stm



    AAIR — Asthma and Allergy Information & Research

    http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/perfume_corr.htm



    • Asthma: could it be caused by something at work?

      Do not overlook the fragrance chemicals in an ordinary office setting! IF the fragrance
      abusers can be noticed for any distance beyond their arm length — the industry’s standard
      “Scent Circle” area — you’ve got yourself a case of perfume pollution. Perfume causes, exacerbates
      and triggers asthma and a range of other diseases. Productivity drops when people feel sick. — barb

      http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/asthma_occup.htm

    ABC — Access BART Coalition

    Join us and help make BART accessible to ALL!

    ABC, the Access BART Coalition, is a coalition of individuals and

    organizations representing members of the elderly and disabled public

    who use BART Trains, BART Express Buses, and ADA-mandated Paratransit

    supported by the Bay Area Rapid Transit District. …



    ABC News



    ABCGED (Association of BC Government Employees with Disabilities)




    ABDC (Association of Birth Defect Children, Inc.)

    http://www.birthdefects.org/





    About.com

    http://www.about.com/




    Acceptable Risk

    top of page




    Access – Accommodation

    Also see EHN’s Take Heart!

    ehnhompg/takheart.htm


    504 — wrightslaw

    “Section 504 is a civil rights law. Section 504 prohibits discrimination
    against individuals with disabilities. Section 504 ensures that the child
    with a disability has equal access to an education. The child may receive
    accommodations and modifications. … “

    http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.index.htm

    The Coalition for a Healthy Ottawa Ontario Canada

    “Debra Sine, Lawyer.

    ‘People with environmental sensitivities have the right to be free from chemical assault.
    Ontario Commissioner of Human Rights said municipalities have a legal duty to
    protect the most vulnerable citizens from harm due to pesticide exposures.’ ”

    http://www.sankey.ws/choc.html


    And, my belief is that all people have a right to be protected from the proliferation of perfume
    poisons. That could begin with honest labeling and honest reporting of the “thorough” testing the
    industry claims it does. Let us have truth in labeling. Let’s see those industry tests for effects
    upon users and nonusers from inhalation, for neurological effects, for systemic effects, for
    effects upon fetuses, our elderly, our already ill, for effects upon all of us over time. IF our modern,
    synthesized scents are as safe as industry claims, then let’s see the chemicals used listed on
    the labels and the results of truly thorough testing. Bump up the testing to include more than
    just dermatological effects to the user. — barb



    JAN – Job Accommdation Network

    A free service of the

    Office of Disability Employment Policy of the U.S. Department of Labor

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/

    U.S. Department of Justice – Justice Management Division

    Manual and Procedures for Providing Reasonable Accommodation

    Equal Employment Opportunity Staff; October 2002

    http://www.usdoj.gov/jmd/eeos/ddaccomprocfinal081502.htm



    top of page

    Return to Access/Accommodation on EHN’s Take Heart!

    ehnhompg/takheart.htm#Access





    Accommodation Suggestions

    ACE – Alternatives for Community & Environment

    “[ACE] has been working in partnership with low income communities and

    communities of color to achieve environmental justice since 1993. …”

    http://www.ace-ej.org/


  • ACE Inhibitors

    • ACE Inhibitors

      By Lawyers and Settlements, Justice for Everyone

      “ACE Inhibitors, drugs that are used to treat high blood pressure, have been

      linked to birth defects. ACE Inhibitors already carry black box warning against

      taking them in the later stages of pregnancy, but now are suspected of causing

      birth defects in the first trimester as well, according to a new study in the [New

      England Journal of Medicine]. …”

      http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/case/ace_inhibitors

    • Fish Peptides

      . . . I don’t know about fish peptides for pregnant women, but I take them to help keep my blood
      pressure down as I fight not only fragrance product poisonings, but also kidney failure. Thus
      far, I’ve not had any adverse effects. Talk this option over with your doctors. — barb


  • Acetaldehyde Chemical Backgrounder

    From the National Safety Council

    Acetaldehyde is just one commonly used flavors and fragrance ingredient

    “Health effects:

    “Acetaldehyde is a substance which may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen,

    according to the Seventh Annual Report on Carcinogens, National Toxicology Program,
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is also classified in EPA’s Toxic

    Release Inventory (TRI) to be a known or suspected carcinogen. When ingested or
    inhaled, acetaldehyde can irritate the eye, nose, and throat; cause conjunctivitis,
    coughing, central nervous system depression, eye and skin burns, dermatitis, and
    delayed pulmonary edema.
    ” [Emphasis added.]

    http://www.nsc.org/library/chemical/Acetalde.htm

  • ACETALDEHYDE — PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION — CAS NO. 75-07-0

    “The main use of acetaldehyde is as an intermediate for the synthesis of other chemicals.
    The main derivatives of Acetaldehyde are the oxygenated solvent Ethyl Acetate,
    Pentaerythritol (used in the production of synthetic resins for the paint industry) and
    Pyridines. Acetaldehyde is used in the production of perfumes, polyester resins,

    and basic dyes. Acetaldehyde is also used as a solvent in the rubber, tanning, and paper
    industries, as a fruit and fish preservative, as a flavoring agent, for hardening
    gelatin, as a denaturant for alcohol and in fuel compositions.”
    [Emphasis added.]

    http://www.chemicalland21.com/arokorhi/petrochemical/Acetaldehyde.htm

  • Acetaldehyde

    CAS number . . . . . . . . . . . 75-07-0

    NIOSH REL. . . . . . . . . . . . None established; NIOSH considers acetaldehyde

    to be a potential occupational carcinogen as defined by the OSHA carcinogen
    policy [29 CFR 1990].

    From, NIOSH’s DOCUMENTATION FOR IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR
    HEALTH CONCENTRATIONS (IDLHs)*

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/75070.html

    Achieving Healthy Indoor Air

    Report of the ATS Workshop: Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 16-19, 1995

    THIS WORKSHOP REPORT WAS APPROVED BY THE ATS

    BOARD OF DIRECTORS, MARCH 1997

    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

    “… Perfumes are among the most difficult to control since they are perceived by their

    users as pleasurable. Personal rights and preferences for perfumed products must be
    evaluated against the discomfort that scents cause for some people. The odoriferous
    materials are highly volatile synthetic chemicals; in effect, they contribute to the total
    VOCs. Scented personal products are not limited to perfumes; they include residual
    scents on clothing from detergents and fabric softeners, soaps, shampoos, deodorants,
    skin lotions, and cosmetics. The only successful method of control is to eliminate these
    odors, either by avoiding their use, as with perfumes, or by using unscented products. …”

    This is such an important paragraph! I hope everyone who is seeking access and

    accommodation — YOU do have an acknowledged right to breathe! — prints out this

    document to use along with the analyses information provided you in EHN’s FDA Petition.

    I fervently hope you have an administrative team that is willing to learn!!!

    Millions of us did not. Yet, accommodating the already chemically injured, improves the air for all. — barb

    http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/3/S33

  • ACN – Association for Comprehensive NeuroTherapy

    http://www.Latitudes.org/ts_articles.htm

    Acne


      AcneNet

      Acne is commonly caused by synthetic fragrances — used by you or others! — barb

      http://www.derm-infonet.com/acnenet/toc.html



    • Natural Solutions for Acne

      Dr. Mercola

      Hmmmm, I didn’t notice advice to avoid fragrances, but do give that a try. But, that means
      everyone in your family must avoid using petrochemical-derived fragrance products also. Dealing
      with the public, whether at school, work, healthcare facilities, theaters, etc., of course, makes the
      goal of being fragrance-free problematic. But perhaps you can begin to educate others about
      the harmful effects of fragrances. There are alternatives. People with MCS, like me, use them! — barb

      http://www.mercola.com/2004/dec/4/acne_solutions.htm

    top of page




    Acronyms




    • Acronym Finder

      This site now sports a couple of moving banners, which I find annoying. But what’s even worse
      for me, is that it won’t work with NetScape, but will work with Internet Explorer. However, if
      you can get this one to work in Explorer, it comes up with a lot of possible answers to your query.– barb 01/02

      http://www.acronymfinder.com/



    • Acronym Search

      This one worked w/NetScape. — barb 01/02

      http://www.acronymsearch.com/

    • The WorldWideWeb Acronym and Abbreviation Server

      This one didn’t work w/NetScape either, but it at least knew GSA. — barb 01/02

      http://www.ucc.ie/info/net/acronyms/acro.html



  • ACS (American Chemical Society)

    Also see articles, below

    http://www.acs.org/


  • ACT (American College of Toxicology)

    http://www.actox.org/

    Action Letters by EHN and members

    actnletr/acletin.htm

    Action on Smoking and Health (ASH)

    http://ash.org/



    ACTIVIST

    http://get.to/activist


    Acupressure

    Acupuncture


  • Action for Nature

    http://www.actionfornature.org/

    ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act)

    Also, see GOVERNEMENT Links (ehnglinx.htm#A)

  • A Guide to Disability Rights Laws – May 2002

    .U.S. Department of Justice; Civil Rights Division; Disability Rights Section

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/cguide.htm

    ADA – The law — PUBLIC LAW 101-336 JULY 26, 1990 104 STAT. 327

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/pages/ada_statute.htm



  • Access Board Adopts Policy to Promote Fragrance-Free Environments

    http://www.access-board.gov/news/fragrance.htm

  • Access Communications …

    “… your resource center for up-to-date information on the ADA and state accessibility
    codes, accessible communications consulting, wayfinding and signage design.”

    http://www.accesscommunications.bigstep.com/employeebios.jhtml

  • Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities

    gopher://trace.wisc.edu/00/ftp/PUB/TEXT/ADA_INFO/REGS/ATBCB.TXT



  • ADA Compliance Guide

    http://www.dc.thompson.com/tpg/able.html


    • Bias intent need not be shown, Supreme Court rules

      “Employees can win discrimination suits, including those brought under the ADA, by

      showing that an employer’s stated reason for an adverse employment action is false,

      even if there is no direct evidence that the employer intended to discriminate, the U.S.

      Supreme Court ruled (Reeves v. Sanderson Plumbing Products, 2000 U.S. LEXIS 3966).”
      http://www.dc.thompson.com/tpg/person/able/ableaug.html


  • ADA Documents

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/document.htm


  • ADA Information Center On-Line

    http://adabbs.hr.state.ks.us/dc/


  • ADA Information on the Web — links

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/


    ADA Home Page

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm


  • ADA Law

    Archives of ADA-LAW@LISTSERV.NODAK.EDU

    http://listserv.nodak.edu/archives/ada-law.html


  • “… An assortment of links to ADA and Disability related URL’s”

    http://www.public.iastate.edu/~sbilling/ada.html

  • Brobeck, Attorneys at Law

  • CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME CREATES NEW PROBLEMS FOR EMPLOYERS (CTS)

    January 1995

    (It could as easily be MCS that creates new problems . . . — barb)



  • Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal

    Dept. of Justice; version 2.1

    Let’s inform the DOJ AND the US Access Board that not all barriers are visible! — barb

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/checktxt.htm

    Ý

  • Chronic Neuroimmune Diseases Information on CFS, FM, MCS, and more…
    Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)

    Melissa Kaplan’s – Last updated November 23, 2002

    http://www.anapsid.org/cnd/disability/ada.html

  • Disability Discrimination in the Workplace

    http://www.cyberscribe.com/talklaw/disabil.shtml

  • Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, Inc. (DREDF)

    is a national law and policy center

    http://www.dredf.org

  • Disability Rights Task Force: on Service Animals

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/animal.htm


  • Disaster Planning for the MCS disAbled in Berkeley, California

    http://members.aol.com/jeannandi/HOMEPAGE/dis_plan.html#l08


  • Discrimination Complaint Form

    Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act

    Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/t2cmpfrm.htm


  • EEOC COMPLIANCE MANUAL

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/pages/disability_definition.htm


  • FACTS ABOUT THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

    “An individual with a disability is a person who:


    • Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities;
    • Has a record of such an impairment; or
    • Is regarded as having such an impairment.”

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/pages/ADA_facts.html

  • “Futile Gesture”

    Susan Molloy thinks this is the most important piece of info I’ve uncovered. Thanks!, Susan.


      Section 308(a)(1) further states that,

      Nothing in this section shall require a person with a disability to engage in a futile
      gesture if such person has actual notice that a person or organization covered by this
      subchapter does not intend to comply with its provisions.


    Is there a lawyer out there who might be able to explain “futile gesture” to us as it might apply
    to the chemically injured and access … e.g., restrooms with fragrance emission devices/systems
    (FEDS), or a workplace that is outgassing chemicals from pesticides or mold or personal care
    products, or a neighbor’s outgassing pesticides, fabric softeners? ETC. — barb

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/briefs/steger.htm

  • A HUMAN RESOURCE PERSPECTIVE ON IMPLEMENTING THE ADA

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/pages/HR_perspective.html

  • Kansas — ADA

    http://adabbs.hr.state.ks.us/dc/

  • The Law Office of Scott C. Van Soye “ADA: Do I Have a Case”

    http://www.swiftsite.com/adaman/



  • Pacific Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center

    http://www.pacdbtac.org/faq.htm



  • PRE-EMPLOYMENT DISABILITY-RELATED QUESTIONS AND

    MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS UNDER THE ADA

    Statutory Deadlines

    http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/pages/Deadlines.htm

    — end ADA list —



    Adaptive Enviroments

    Universal design, education & training, publications & library, technical assistance & consulting

    http://www.adaptenv.org/default.asp


    ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)



    Addison’s Disease

    Just wondering out loud: The experts tell us that Addison’s is caused by adrenal
    insufficiency. However, I wonder what causes THAT. As Addison’s Disease is an endocrine
    disorder, I can’t help but wonder if our reliance upon modern chemical products — drugs,
    fragrances, pesticides, plastics … — have anything to do with it. And remember, phthalates are not
    JUST plasticisers, they are common fragrance ingredients, too. Do our government and medical
    experts ask these questions and then do the research and then openly publish the data? — barb

    Addison Wesley Longman

    “Non-fiction, general interest books on a wide range of topics”


    Addicted to fragrances?

    Years ago — early 90s — a co-worker said, I HAVE to wear perfume! You can imagine tone of

    voice and look upon face as that was stated. I mentioned it to Julia Kendall, who responded,

    “Oh, the poor dear is addicted to fragrances. I’m sure of it, based on my research!” — barb


    • See EHN’s section on Huffing

      ehnlinx/h.htm#Huffing

    • Exposure Pathways – EPA’s Emergency Response Program

      Think of fragrance chemicals — unsubstantiated for safety. — barb

      “… Air. When the hazardous substance takes the form of vapors or is absorbed by
      particulate matter (e.g., dust), the simple act of breathing can expose people to
      contamination. In some cases, a person’s skin can absorb a hazardous substance in vapor
      form, although inhalation is considered the greater threat. …”

      http://www.epa.gov/superfund/programs/er/hazsubs/pathways.htm




    • MedScape Query

      Moscow Plans Crackdown on Rampant Alcoholism

      During the 1980s, then-President Mikhail Gorbachev attempted to

      rein-in alcoholism, but the drive merely caused an upsurge in illegal

      distilling, with some desperate alcoholics drinking cocktails of shoe polish,

      perfume or antifreeze to get drunk.

      Imagine drinking perfume to satisfy an alcohol addiction. But then fragrances are heavy on the
      alcohol. Enough so that fine jewelers tell you not to get perfume on your jewelry. — barb

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/451688

    • “New Dior fragrance: Scent of addiction”

      BY ANGELINA MALHOTRA-SINGH

      Of The Examiner Staff; Publication date: 11/04/2002

      Talk about aptly named! Addiction is right up there with Poison and Eternity . . .

      not to mention, Escape, which is what the already fragrance-sensitized individual must
      do to avoid asthma, migraines, anaphylaxis, sinuisits, laryngitis, dizziness, severe coughing
      attacks, eczema, acne, rashes . . . Fragrances can adversely affect people of all ages, including
      fetuses and infants, at secondary and tertiary levels of exposure. — barb

      http://www.examiner.com/news/default.jsp?story=n.addict.1104w



    • PubMedQuery

      Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1999 Apr;63(4):743-8

      Potentiation of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by perfume and phytoncid.

      Aoshima H, Hamamoto K

      Department of Physics, Biology and Informatics, Faculty of Science,

      Yamaguchi University, Japan. E-mail: aoshima@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

      ” … Since it is known that the potentiation of GABAA receptors by benzodiazepine,

      barbiturate, steroids and anesthetics induces the anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and

      sedative activity or anesthetic effect, these results suggest the possibility that the

      intake of perfume or phytoncid through the lungs, the skin or the intestines modulates

      the neural transmission in the brain through ionotropic GABAA receptors and

      changes the frame of the human mind, as alcohol or tobacco does.” [Emphasis added.]

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=10361687&dopt=Abstract


      Or: http://www.jsbba.or.jp/e/e_05/bbb6304e.html#-21-




    Additives

    Adhesives — LOW-emitting VOCs

    Ads for housing, cars, land, plus

    Calif. Health Code against leaking scent ads found in magazines, newspapers, etc.

    It is high time for firms that do not use scented advertising to stand up against harmful,
    scented ads. Why? Because scented advertising means that ALL of the mail, or newspapers or
    magazines must be removed from the household and cast aside without notice. It only takes one
    polluting ad to make unsafe the entire contents of one’s mailbox, the newspaper, or magazines —
    even magazines one would hope to buy from a newstand. Safer advertising is ignored in the
    wake of the harmful, perfume pollution of a few ads. It is known that scent strips trigger asthma.

    Those of us who are made ill by the volatilizing chemicals from perfumed paper or scent strips

    should WRITE. Use the following information tomake a formal complaint with the Postal Service,
    or newspaper, magazines, department store advertising fillers. The law is unenforced, likely even unknown, but that’s because so few take the time to file a complaint or write a letter. — barb




      Note: This section will reflect changes only as they are given to me, or as my time at the

      computer allows.

    • Cars


    • Housing


    • Land


      • Arizona Land

        Public Service Announcement of 7.27.01. — barb

        az


    • Advertising


      • AD Busters

        http://www.adbusters.org/main/index.html



      • Ad storyboard for a perfume

        http://members.aol.com/Jovifan2/PerfumeAd.html

      • Advertising Fraud

        Federal Trade Commission

        http://www.ftc.gov/ftc/consumer.htm

        Perfume Portal

        http://www.perfume2000.com/


        • IF you are offended by male nudity, do not open this link! — barb

          “THE NACKED SCENTS”

          NAKED MALE ADS STIR CONTROVERSY IN EUROPE

          Yves Saint Laurent Uses Full-Frontal Nudity

          By Lawrence J. Speer and Ali Qassim

          “PARIS (AdAge.com) — Just when it seemed that French fashion houses had given up
          on the use of so-called porno chic ads, crosstown design rivals Yves Saint Laurent and
          Dior have set off a new controversy with the use of provocative sexual imagery in
          campaigns for their newest perfumes. Because AdAge.com deems the image otherwise
          inappropriate for publication, it has whited out the genitalia displayed in this
          controversial Yves Saint Laurent print ad.

          “…’Perfume is worn on the skin, so why hide the body?’ …”

          How about some pictures of what perfume does inside the body and brain? What’s put on the
          skin, goes through the skin! (Dr. Richard Conrad in letter to FDA.) — barb

          http://www.perfume2000.com/Home/Articles/the%20nackedscents.asp

        • “perfume sprayers” a though job

          Army of perfume sprayers descend on holiday shoppers

          By MEGAN ROSENFELD; The Washington Post

          “WASHINGTON — Like the jingle of the Salvation Army collectors and the thrum of Muzak carols, the spritz of perfume sprayers is abroad in the land. A little Giorgio? A splash of Shalimar? A snoutful of Opium, perhaps?


          ” ‘No!’ retorts a shopper at the Hecht’s, a department store in downtown D.C. …”

          “… ‘This is fun work, but you have to have a thick skin,’ says LeCompt.

          ‘You get rejected all the time.’ …”

          “… And a lot of them don’t really believe there is such a thing as an allergy to perfume.
          ‘People just say that to get away from us,’ says Jeanne Crow, dispensing sniffs of Oscar
          and Opium. But most fragrance models now hand out cards embedded with scent
          rather than spraying people — unless they get permission.”

          http://www.perfume2000.com/Home/Articles/perfumespray.asp

        SCENTED ADS

        Have you met scented ads that don’t leak? I haven’t. Those that leak are illegal.– barb

      • California Health Code

        USE THIS INFO TO INFORM NEWSPAPERS, POSTAL AUTHORITIES

      • CALIFORNIA CODES

        HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE

        SECTION 110390-110420 (Fragrance advertising agents)

        [CALIFORNIA CODES; HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE;

        SECTION 110390-110420; 110420.

        Go to California Law

        http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html

        Click on “Health and Safety Code” in the left hand column, key in the word

        “fragrance” and click the search button. Scroll to the bottom of the page.




          110420. (a) Any fragrance advertising insert contained in a

          newspaper, magazine, mailing, or other periodically printed material

          shall contain only microencapsulated oils. Glue tabs or binders

          shall be used to prevent premature activation of the fragrance

          advertising insert.

          “Fragrance advertising insert” means a printed piece with

          encapsulated fragrance applied to it that is activated by opening a

          flap or removing an overlying ply of paper.

          Paperstocks employed in the manufacture of fragrance advertising

          inserts shall have a maximum porosity of 20 Sheffield units or 172

          Gurley-Hill units.

          (b) Any person who distributes fragrance advertising inserts in

          violation of this section, is guilty of an infraction and shall, if

          convicted, be subject to a fine of one hundred dollars ($100) for

          each distribution. The fine shall apply to each mass mailing or

          distribution, and to each mass publication of a magazine or newspaper

          in violation of this section. The fine shall not apply, however, to

          each individual letter, magazine, newspaper, or fragrance

          advertising insert so distributed. Section 111825 is not applicable

          to violations of this section.

          (c) This section shall become operative on January 1, 1992.


        For more information on protection — IF you can get someone to pay attention to you —

        see EHN’s section on Postal Information

      Advice Columnists

      Don’t hesitate to educate the advice columnists. — barb


    • Advocate-On-Line

      A great on-line newsletter. — barb

      http://www.chebucto.ca/~cares/




    • AERIAS

      http://www.aerias.org/


    • AEHA – Allergy and Environmental Health Association

    • Allergy and Environmental Health Association – Nova Scotia (AEHA-NS).

      WARNING – “Natural” gas may be harmful to your health

      http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/6847/index.html


      AEHF (American Environmental Health Foundation)

      http://aehf.com



      AeriasTM

      Better health through indoor air quality awareness

      http://www.aerias.org/default.asp


      • Asthma – A National Emergency

        ” Common indoor pollutants such as molds, animal and insect allergens, and chemicals trigger asthma.

        “…Minimizing Chemical Pollutants and Odors

        Volatile chemicals and odors can be minimized through removal of the source and/or
        use of low-emitting/low-odor furnishings, materials, and processes. Many
        commercial and public facilities are endorsing smoke free, fragrance-free environments. …”

        http://www.aerias.org/cgi-bin/news-shell.asp?article=159

      • Personal Care Products: Perfume, Hairspray, Aftershave, Deodorant, etc.

        “Personal care products and their contribution to indoor air quality is a topic that is both
        personal and political. These types of products can trigger allergic reactions and
        asthmatic attacks in many people as well as being very detrimental to those who are
        chemically sensitive. …”

        http://www.aerias.org/cached_document_58.htm

      • IAQ Investigations in the Workplace and other Buildings

        http://www.aerias.org/kview.asp?DocId=48&spaceid=2&subid=13

      Affinity

      ” AFFINITY is Ohio’s Free environmental newspaper distributed throughout Northeastern

      Ohio and in various cities and towns throughout the state. The purpose of this publication

      is to provide vital information to help educate citizens so that they can take a more active

      role in protecting their environment. In addition AFFINITY serves as a forum for

      environmental activists to voice their concerns.

      http://www.greenlink.org/affinity/index.html



      AFL-CIO’s Executive PayWatch

      http://www.aflcio.org/paywatch/index.htm


      Agencies and Advocate Groups

      for the Chemically Sensitive / Environmentally Ill

      (Also see EHN’s page E, Environment and the MCS page of links)







      top of page




      Aging

        (Note: The best way I’ve found to knock years off is to eliminate superfluous toxic chemicals

        from your life. You can live without fragrances and pesticides and you, your family, your pets will

        be far healthier. — barb)


      • Life Extension Foundation

        http://www.lef.org/


      AGNOSIA, APHASIA, APRAXIA and

      Related Terms for Cognitive, Behavioral and Neurological Disorders

      Professor Mark Dubin – University of Colorado

      This is quite a glossary and I thank Dr. Dubin for making it available. As those of us living with
      MCS realize, many of these words may apply to us.

      Anosmia — word for not being able to smell odors. So why is it MCS detractors, who come up
      with the diagnosis of “learned” response, or the other beauty, “It’s all in your head!,” fail to
      take into account all of those who react to chemicals without being able to smell them? — barb

      http://spot.colorado.edu/~dubin/talks/agnosia.html




      Aggression & fragrances

      California Health and Safety Code Section 41700

      41700. Except as otherwise provided in Section 41705, no person shall discharge from
      any source whatsoever such quantities of air contaminants or other material which cause
      injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to any considerable number of persons or
      to the public, or which endanger the comfort, repose, health, or safety of any such
      persons or the public, or which cause, or have a natural tendency to cause, injury or
      damage to business or property. …”


      “… 41705. (a) Section 41700 shall not apply to odors emanating from agricultural
      operations necessary for the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals.

      http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cacodes/hsc/41700-41712.html



      • Fragrance Exposure Causes Aggression Hyperactivity and Nerve Damage
        Neurotoxicology, Volume 1:221-237, 1979 brought to you by ChemTox

        Aggression or aggressive behavior, as a result of fragrance exposure, is often attached to the
        already chemically injured because we protest our being poisoned. Why is it that no one thinks in
        terms of AGGRESSION regarding those people using fragrance on their person or as a
        handheld weapon as a tool of assault. Why are they never viewed as having become AGGRESSIVE
        because of their chemical stews known beningly as “fragrance”? — barb

        http://www.chem-tox.com/pregnancy/perfume.htm


      • FRAGRANCES AND ASSAULTS BY WEARERS

        Info available on this EHN page

        ehnlinx/a.htm#Assaulted

      Agriculture

      Also see EHN’s Organics listings

      ehnlinx/o.htm#Organic

      AIDS

      EHN does not endorse any therapy, doctor, etc. The information is here as a resource.

      Do your own investigative work. Look at more than just one side of any issue. And, always talk
      with your own healthcare or legal professioal. — barb



      • An Effective Natural Therapy for AIDS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), and

        Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome (CFIDS)

        Jonathan Campbell Health Consultant; Natural Therapies for Chronic Illness

        http://www.cqs.com/aidstherapy.htm

      • ChronicIllnet

        Immune System Imbalance Syndromes (ISIS)

        Keynote Address at Houston Conference on AIDS in America; Dr. Howard Urnovitz

        report by L. Joel Martinez

        http://www.chronicillnet.org/news/RITA.html


      • The Ailing Environment – Chemical Sensitivity

        Alpha Nutrition Online

        http://www.nutramed.com/environment/mcs.htm



      • Imagine a World Without AIDS

        http://www.theanswertocancer.com/AIDS/

      • Keep Hope Alive

        Serving the community of people living with health problems such as: HIV, HHV-6,

        AIDS, nutrition, immune system, chronic fatigue

        http://www.execpc.com/~keephope/keephope.html

      • Rethinking AIDS Website

        http://www.virusmyth.com/


      • Shireley’s Wellness Cafe

        “AIDS/HIV/AZT Controversy – Scientits rejecting AIDS’ conventional wisdom – The True Origins of AIDS & Ebola – GENOCIDE, AIDS & THE FDA – AZT Forced Treatment of Kids – Healing AIDS: no drug

        ” ‘AIDS is a cruel deception that is maintained because so many people are making
        money from it. Take away this money and the entire system of mythology will collapse.’
        Charles Thomas, PhD … Former chair of the Cell Biology Department, Scripps
        Research Institute

        “‘Still today there are NO scientific proofs for the existence of ‘HIV’ nor for the validity
        of the tests.’ – Dr. Helene Gayle, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, July 7, 2000,
        International AIDS Conference, South Africa

        “A growing number of scientists world-wide have publicly denounced the total failure of
        the HIV/AIDS hypothesis, questioned the meaning of the ‘AIDS test’, and criticized
        the use of AZT which has been proven to be a toxic poison that makes the patient
        sicker and is actually the cause of AIDS deaths. The group includes scientists such as Kary
        Mullis, who won the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1993 for inventing the polymerase
        chain reaction used to test for HIV, James DeMeo, Ph.D., Director of Orgone
        Biophysical Research Lab, and Peter H. Duesberg, Ph.D., a professor of molecular and

        cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley.

        “Please take your time to scroll all the way down to the bottom of this lengthy page.”

        http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/1158/AIDS.HTM




      Air

      A CALL TO INDOOR ARMS

      Richard L. Corsi, The University of Texas at Austin

      An excellent read on Indoor Air Quality. — barb

      http://www.utexas.edu/research/ti2e/IAQ_Briefs/calltoarms.html






      Cleaner Air and

      California Building Standards


      Adopted, November 28, 2001



      Special thanks to Michael Mankin, Chief, Office of Access

      Compliance, California Division of the State Architect;

      Elizabeth Randolph and Linda Huber, DSA staff;

      and Jim Abrams, California Hotel and Lodging Association.


      Folks, THANKS to the years of efforts of Susan Molloy, along with Mary Lamielle and Dr. Lawrence Plumlee, and more recently, Linda McElver of Canaries Foundation, Connie Barker of EHN and Ecology House boards, all of you who wrote regarding California’s Building Standards, and my own efforts, the Cleaner Air standards have been adopted by California.

      events/clnerair.htm


      Dear Friends,

      Do you face barriers to your safe access to housing and medical facilities? The designated Contact Persons, for our questions regarding modifications to the California Building Standards, are:


        Mike Nowman

        State Housing Law Program Manager

        Department of Housing and Community Development

        Tel.: (916) 445-9471

        E-mail: mnowman@hcd.ca.gov

        Fax: (916) 327-4712

        Susan M. Botelho

        Chief, Facilities Support Section

        Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development

        Tel.: (916) 654-2012

        Fax: (916) 654-2973

      Our proposal for “Cleaner-Air” signage, language, and a pictogram marking the rooms and hallways in which we might have the most hope for access within California State facilities, is scheduled to be heard by the California Building Standards Commission on November 28, 10 a.m. at 400 “R” Street, Sacramento.

      Please attend if you are able – a public show of support for this effort is essential, but CALL FIRST to be sure the CBSC schedule hasn’t been changed (again).

      Get the schedule updates or other details from Michael Mankin, Access Compliance office, Division of the State Architect, at (916) 322-4700 or Linda Huber at (916) 324-9495.

      THANKS!

      Susan Molloy



       

      Two bits’ worth from barb: Remember, the EPA tells us that indoor air pollution is

      worse than outdoor air pollution AND we spend far more time indoors. Seems to me

      it is not a huge leap in logic to figure out that the volatile organic compounds in synthetic
      fragrances in personal care and household and janitorial cleaning/maintenance

      products can play a significant role in indoor air pollution. See EPA’s

      Why Should You Be Concerned About the Quality of the Air That You Breathe?

      http://www.epa.gov/iedweb00/index.html


      Another point from the EPA: “Studies have found that levels of several organics average
      2 to 5 times higher indoors than outdoors. During and for several hours immediately
      after certain activities, such as paint stripping, levels may be 1,000 times background
      outdoor levels.”


      http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/insidest.html

      Also see: San Francisco’s “Achieving and maintaining good air quality”

      http://www.sustainable-sf.org/Plan/Air/intro.htm


      • 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants

        Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center

        The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) and Small Business

        Gives chemical name and CAS number.

        http://www.pprc.org/pprc/sbap/facts/189haps.html

      • Achieving Healthy Indoor Air

        Report of the ATS Workshop: Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 16-19, 1995

        THIS WORKSHOP REPORT WAS APPROVED BY THE ATS BOARD OF DIRECTORS, MARCH 1997

        Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med., Volume 156, Number 3, September 1997, S33-S64

        Other Point Sources in Homes and Offices

        ” … Perfumes are among the most difficult to control since they are perceived by their
        users as pleasurable. Personal rights and preferences for perfumed products must be
        evaluated against the discomfort that scents cause for some people. The odoriferous
        materials are highly volatile synthetic chemicals; in effect, they contribute to the total
        VOCs. Scented personal products are not limited to perfumes; they include residual
        scents on clothing from detergents and fabric softeners, soaps, shampoos, deodorants,
        skin lotions, and cosmetics. The only successful method of control is to eliminate these
        odors, either by avoiding their use, as with perfumes, or by using unscented products. …”

        http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/3/S33

      • Airborne Allergies


        • Allergies and Airborne Irritants — Harvard’s Medical School

          “Allergens And Airborne Irritants

          “Allergic reactions or responses to fumes, perfumes, smoke or other irritants in the air
          may trigger an asthma attack. Most children with asthma are also allergic. …

          “The key to preventing asthma attacks from allergies and airborne irritants is avoidance:
          Special measures must be taken to prevent exposure to known triggers. …”

          Notice that word, AVOIDANCE. But those of us who avoid using the toxic chemical fragrance
          products are subjected to those chemicals as they volatilize to become one with the air we all
          must breathe. Therefore, it is important that public venues use fragrance-free products for
          cleaning and maintenance and request personnel and visitors refrain from wearing/using
          scented products. Public venues include but are not limited to: healthcare facilities, schools,
          workplaces, places of worship, government buildings, public transportation conveyances
          (including airplanes!) — barb

          http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH?t=6932&p=~br,IHW|~st,3457|~r,WSIHW000|~b,*|&

          And, there’s this to consider . . .

        • Perfumes cause allergies – News

          “…The study concluded that the number of eczema patients with perfume allergy has

          doubled since 1979 from one in twenty eczema patients to one in ten in 1995. …”

          “Tests by the perfume/cosmetics industry

          “The majority of studies have been undertaken by the perfume/cosmetics industry, and
          only a minor part are publicly available. Jeanne Duus Johansen suggests that when
          the results are made public, they are likely to show better results than those of the
          studies she has been involved with. This is because the industry tests perfumes on healthy
          persons and so the number of allergic eczema reactions will always be lower than in
          the studies at Gentofte University Hospital, where the substances are tested on eczema
          patients. This means that the industry’s research will not show how the
          products affect people with allergy problems. …”

          Folks, this is just skin reactions — of the primary user, at that. What about effects over time from
          absorption? What about effects over time from inhaling? Remember scents are made to be
          inhaled (smelled), yet the industry doesn’t openly test for effects upon inhalation . . . inhalation by
          user nor for effects upon inhalation by nonusers. Buyer BEWARE! Look for organic products,

          free of petrochemical-derived fragrances for personal care and for cleaning and maintenance — barb

          http://www.gina.antczak.btinternet.co.uk/CU/CUNEWS.HTM#article1




      • EPA Studies upon which Julia Kendall based her work

        ehnhompg/kendall.htm


      • Exposure Pathways – EPA’s Emergency Response Program

        Think of fragrance chemicals — unsubstantiated for safety. — barb

        “… Air. When the hazardous substance takes the form of vapors or is absorbed by
        particulate matter (e.g., dust), the simple act of breathing can expose people to
        contamination. In some cases, a person’s skin can absorb a hazardous substance in vapor
        form, although inhalation is considered the greater threat. …”

        http://www.epa.gov/superfund/programs/er/hazsubs/pathways.htm




      • Dr. Whitaker

        http://www.drwhitaker.com/wit_con_allergies.php

         

      • Air Currents

        http://www.aircurrents.org/



        AIR POLLUTION

        California Health and Safety Code Section 41700

        41700. Except as otherwise provided in Section 41705, no person shall discharge from
        any source whatsoever such quantities of air contaminants or other material which cause
        injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to any considerable number of persons or
        to the public, or which endanger the comfort, repose, health, or safety of any such
        persons or the public, or which cause, or have a natural tendency to cause, injury or
        damage to business or property. …”


        “… 41705. (a) Section 41700 shall not apply to odors emanating from agricultural
        operations necessary for the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals.

        http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cacodes/hsc/41700-41712.html


        • A CALL TO INDOOR ARMS

          Richard L. Corsi, The University of Texas at Austin

          An excellent read on Indoor Air Quality. — barb

          http://www.utexas.edu/research/ti2e/IAQ_Briefs/calltoarms.html

        • AIRBORNE PATHOGEN DATABASE

          Pennsylvania State University

          Viruses, Bacteria, Fungi

          http://www.bio.psu.edu/People/Faculty/Whittam/apdbase/

        • Air “Fresheners“/Deodorizers = Pollutants

          Also see Fragrance Info, EHN’s General Links, page F at

          ehnlinx/f.htm#Fragrance

          Folks, I have a big problem with the industry being able to call these recognized pollutants air
          “fresheners.” They are anything but and the worst part of that misleading name is that people
          use them thinking they are helping improve the air.

          I’ve had too many comments now from folks who ask: Why when [they] “freshen” the air in the
          child’s room that the child (or children) get an immediate asthmatic attack?

          Why? Because they are using fragrance products that are air pollutants. If they want to really

          freshen the air, they should open windows. The EPA tells us that indoor air is more polluted than
          outdoor air, so let the outdoor air in . . . unless you live next to a refinery or other chemical
          plant. But then, if that’s the case, for crying out loud, don’t add to the air pollution by using
          products that have the word “fragrance” on the label.

          Everyone using petrochemically derived fragrances are adding unkown petrochemicals to not only
          their air, but your air too. Fragrances are made to volatilize, to become one with the air
          everyone breathes, regardless of health status. Years of writing to our government agencies,
          pleading that they begin accurately informing the public regarding fragrance products, has gained
          little or nothing . . . depending upon the agency.

          So, folks, it is up to you. As it is said, VOTE WITH YOUR POCKETBOOK. Buy baking soda to
          put around your house or an attractive little dish, into which you’ve put a little vinegar. Neither
          vinegar nor baking soda will pollute the air and they will help eliminate natural odors. –

          Fragrances are polluting assaults on everyone, whether they or their doctors are yet aware. Just
          try to get someone to take this seriously when you are talking about a personal health issue
          caused by fragrances. However, IF enough of us try, we’ll sooner gain air freer of petrochemical-

          derived fragrances. Do remember Margaret Mead’s famous quote: Never doubt that a
          small group of dedicated individuals can change the world … indeed, it’s the only thing
          that ever has.
          barb


          July 27, 2006; NIEHS PR #06-11 —

          Folks, what have we been saying all along???? Well, lookie here. Of course, they say
          MAY, and we say WILL, but what they hey, this is at least some recognition of the polluting effects
          and health damage associated with synthetically scented products. Air “freshener,” my kiester!

          For those who want a customized letter to send, regardin harmful effects of air

          “fresheners,” go to MCS America

          http://www.mcs-america.org/customairfreshenerletter.doc

          — barb

          .

          Chemical in Many Air Fresheners May Reduce Lung Function

          New research shows that a chemical compound found in many air fresheners,
          toilet bowl cleaners, mothballs and other deodorizing products, may be harmful to
          the lungs. Human population studies at the National Institute of Environmental Health

          Sciences (NIEHS), a part of the National Institutes of Health, found that exposure to a
          volatile organic compound (VOC), called 1,4 dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB) may cause modest
          reductions in lung function.

          NIH News; NIEHS contact: Robin Mackar (919) 541-0073

          http://www.niehs.nih.gov/oc/news/airfreshener.htm

            California Health and Safety Code Section 41700

            41700. Except as otherwise provided in Section 41705, no person shall discharge from
            any source whatsoever such quantities of air contaminants or other material which cause
            injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to any considerable number of persons or
            to the public, or which endanger the comfort, repose, health, or safety of any such
            persons or the public, or which cause, or have a natural tendency to cause, injury or
            damage to business or property. …”


            “… 41705. (a) Section 41700 shall not apply to odors emanating from agricultural
            operations necessary for the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals.

            http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cacodes/hsc/41700-41712.html



            Remember, naphthalene is commonly used in mothballs, deodorizers and air “fresheners.”

            Naphthalene can cause diarrhea. All bathroom humor aside, that ain’t fun — in fact,

            it can be downright painful — if the diarrhea reaction happens about a half hour after

            you’ve left the facility that gave it to you in the first place . . . and you are out in the

            middle of nowhere as far as finding another restroom is concerned. — barb


            • Air Fresheners Create Indoor Smog

              EHANS; UPdate spring 2005

              “Plug in air fresheners containing fragrances such as pinene and d¼limonene can combine
              with ozone in the air to create a potentially harmful smog inside houses. Ozone is a
              common component of both urban and rural air. Researchers from the US
              Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studied what happened when the substances
              combined as they would in an indoor environment. They found that the combination
              generated formaldehyde, a probable carcinogen, as well as related compounds which are
              associated with respiratory problems.”

              http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Health/Nsaeha/s05fresheners.html

            • Aerosol Hazards by NBC5DFW

              A special treat: Lynn Lawson is interviewed. However, NBC5DFW’s report is not quite
              accurate. Lynn IS safe in her home, which is not more toxic than outdoors, and she doesn’t
              “prefer spending her days outdoors” (winter in Illinois is pretty cold). Lynn tells us: “What

              I am spraying in our kitchen is a bottle filled with vinegar and water, not an aerosol.” Also, she
              provided the producer a lot of info on fragrances, which wound up on the cutting room floor because
              the producer needed to stick to her topic: aerosols and air fresheners.– barb)

              http://nbc5dfw.healthsurfing.com/1999/12/06/


            • Air Resources Board and University of California, Berkeley —

              A report worth reading. As have others, I’ve always contended that IF they would do the
              research, then we’d learn just how harmful to health petrochemically derived fragrance products
              are. There’s more research to be done on more products, but this is a start. — barb


              • Household cleaners and air fresheners emit toxic pollutants

                May 25, 2006, 12:33, Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena

                “Their results indicate that we need to look beyond the directly emitted compounds.”

                By UC Berkeley, When used indoors under certain conditions, many common household
                cleaners and air fresheners emit toxic pollutants at levels that may lead to health risks,
                according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and
                Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

                http://www.rxpgnews.com/research/environment/pollution/article_4312.shtml

                   . . . and that led to . . .

                Principal Investigator: William W. Nazaroff

                University of California, Berkeley

                April 2006



                ARB Contract No. 01-336 (Full Report)

                ABSTRACT

                When cleaning products and air fresheners are used indoors, occupants are exposed to
                airborne chemicals, potentially leading to health risks. Indoor air pollutant exposures
                owing to cleaning product and air freshener use depend on emissions from products,
                dynamic behavior of chemical species, and human factors. A series of experiments was
                conducted to investigate volatile organic compound emissions, concentrations, and
                reactive chemistry associated with the household use of cleaning products and air
                fresheners. Research focused on two common classes of ingredients in cleaning products
                and air fresheners: ethylene-based glycol ethers, which are classified as toxic air
                contaminants, and terpenes, which react rapidly with ozone. A shelf-survey of retail
                outlets led to the selection of 21 products whose chemical composition was characterized.
                Among the criteria used to select these products were ready availability through
                California retail outlets and, for the majority of products, expectation that they contained
                ethylene-based glycol ethers, terpenes and related compounds, or both. Of the 17
                cleaning products characterized, four contained substantial levels of d-limonene (4-25% by

                mass), three contained terpenoids that are characteristic of pine oil, six contained
                substantial levels of ethylene-based glycol ethers (0.8-10% by mass), and five contained
                less than 0.2% of any of the target analytes. Xylene in one product was the only other
                toxic air contaminant detected. Among the four air fresheners characterized, three
                contained substantial quantities (9-14% by mass) of terpene hydrocarbon and terpene
                alcohol constituents, with linalool being the most abundant. Six of the 21 products were
                investigated in simulated-use experiments in which emissions and concentrations of
                primary constituents were measured. Cleaning products that contain 2- butoxyethanol

                as an active ingredient produced one-hour-average concentrations of 300 to 2,300 µg/m 3

                immediately after simulated typical use in a room-sized chamber. For cleaning products
                that contain d-limonene as an active ingredient, corresponding levels were 1,000 to
                6,000 µg/m 3 . Application of a pine-oil based cleaner produced one-hour-average
                concentrations of 10-1300 µg/m 3 for terpene hydrocarbons and terpene alcohols.
                Reactive chemistry was studied by exposing constituents of three products to ozone, both
                in a bench-scale chamber and during simulated use. Prominent products of the
                reaction of terpenes with ozone included formaldehyde (a toxic air contaminant), hydroxyl

                radical, and secondary organic aerosol (a form of fine particulate matter). Incorporating
                the new experimental data, exposures were estimated for several simulated use
                scenarios. Under ordinary circumstances, exposures to 2-butoxyethanol, formaldehyde,
                and secondary organic aerosol are not expected to be as high as guideline values solely

                as a result of cleaning product or air freshener use. However, ordinary use could lead to
                exposure levels of similar magnitude as guideline values. Scenario model results
                suggest that exposure levels could exceed guideline values under exceptional yet plausible
                conditions, such as cleaning a large surface area in a small room. The results of this
                study provide important information for understanding the inhalation exposures to
                certain air pollutants that can result from the use of common household products.

                http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/abstracts/01-336.htm




            • Aerosols linked with baby illness

              BBC News Online

              http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_435000/435652.stm



            • Air & Climate Files – 2003

              Mindfully.org

              http://www.mindfully.org/Air/2003/air2003.htm

            • Air freshener chemicals and their health effects

              Air-Purifier-Basics.com

              http://www.air-purifier-basics.com/air-freshener-health.html

            • AIR FRESHENER – Hazardous ComponentsNot including fragrances. — barb

              St. Louis-Jefferson Solid Waste Management District

              http://www.stlouisjeffersonswmd.org/hhwdesc.htm#DescHHWProds

            • Air Fresheners

              By Rosalind Anderson PhD and Julius Anderson, PhD, MD, Anderson Laboratories

              http://www.andersonlaboratories.com/alweb23a.htm

            • Air Fresheners

              “… Air fresheners work in one of the following four ways: by interfering with your ability
              to smell by way of a nerve-deadening agent; by coating your nasal passages with an
              undetectable oil film; by covering up one smell with another; and (rarely) by breaking
              down the offensive odor. Despite their name, air fresheners do little to freshen the air.
              Aerosol fresheners can be harmful to lungs if inhaled in high concentrations or for
              prolonged periods of time. Solid fresheners may be poisonous if eaten by children or pets.


              ” Use: If freshener is in aerosol form, do not breathe fumes. Avoid skin contact.

              Use only in well-ventilated areas. …”

              Tell that to healthcare facilities that have these air POLLUTERS up in restrooms. — barb

              http://www.epa.gov/seahome/housewaste/house/airfresh.htm


              • Air Fresheners — EPA’s “Around your House”

                Learn some of the dangers . . . the EPA overlooked the danger of synthetic scents! They

                suggest you read the label, BUT labels lack a lot of information, and hide dangerous chemicals

                behind trade secret laws or behind the misleading words, like “Fragrance,” “Parfum or”Inerts.” — barb

                http://www.epa.gov/kidshometour/products/airf.htm


            • Air-fresheners cause a stink

              Fears raised as plug-ins linked to cancer compounds. 10 May 2004

              Mark Peplow © Nature News Service / Macmillan Magazines Ltd 2004

              ” A potentially harmful smog can form inside homes through reactions between

              air-fresheners and ozone, say researchers at the US Environmental Protection Agency

              (EPA). The reactions generate formaldehyde, classed as a probable carcinogen, and

              related compounds that many experts believe are responsible for respiratory problems. …”

              http://www.nature.com/nsu/nsu_pf/040503/040503-11.html

            • Air Fresheners Create Indoor Smog

              [EHANS] UPdate spring 2005

              “Plug in air fresheners containing fragrances such as pinene and d¼limonene can combine
              with ozone in the air to create a potentially harmful smog inside houses. …”

              http://www.environmentalhealth.ca/s05fresheners.html

            • Air Fresheners Really Air Polluters

              Dean Edell (aka Dr. Dean); July 01, 1998

              “DEAN EDELL, M.D. Breathe in, breathe out. What you’re supposed to breathe is plain
              ole fresh air, not pollution – but not perfume either. So why do so many of us turn to
              air fresheners to freshen what is already fresh? Lots of folks put them in their kitchen,
              in their bath, and all over the house. Many even put them in their cars. …

              “First of all, researchers say what air fresheners don’t do, is improve air quality. In fact,
              fresheners don’t even make odors disappear, they just make the nose less sensitive
              to bad smells by masking one smell with the other….

              “Depending on the brand, fresheners can release camphor, alcohol, limonene and others
              which might be harmful when vaporized and breathed. Some contain more toxic
              chemicals like paradichlorobenzene – also used as a moth repellent – which is now so
              common it now turns up in trace amounts in almost all blood samples. ‘But the real
              potential for harm is to people with asthma and other breathing problems. Experts say
              anyone with respiratory problems may want to avoid most air fresheners. Best
              advice? Try a little baking soda in the cat box or garbage can, otherwise maybe open a
              window and let the fresh air in’ [Emphasis added.]

              „END NOTE The experts add, clean indoor air should not smell of anything. If it has a
              chronic stale, musty or strange smell, it could indicate a problem. „

              http://www.healthcentral.com/DrDean/DeanFullTextTopics.cfm?ID=1192



              OR: http://web.archive.org/web/19990825051050/http://www.healthcentral.com/DrDean/DeanFullTextTopics.cfm?ID=1192

            • Air Freshners

              Rob Edwards; UK New Scientist; 9/5/99

              http://neuro-www.mgh.harvard.edu/forum_2/TouretteSyndromeF/9.5.993.45AMAirFreshners.html

              Air Fresheners and the Andersons, Julius MD,PhD and Rosalind, PhD

              Anderson Laboratories

              Toxic effects of air freshener emissions.

              Rosalind Anderson Ph.D. and Julius Anderson M.D.-Ph.D.

              Archives of Environmental Health(1997) 52: 433-441.

              Excerpted:

              ” … Under controlled conditions, we had groups of laboratory mice

              breath the fumes released by several types of air fresheners.

              We found scientific data demonstrating irritation of the eyes,

              nose, throat, and sinuses; difficulty breathing; asthmatic

              reactions, and changes in nervous system function(loss of balance,

              tremors, and convulsions). Several of the mice died as a

              result of breathing these chemicals. …”

              http://www.andersonlaboratories.com/alweb23a.htm

              EHANS


              • Air Fresheners Create Indoor Smog

                UPdate spring 2005

                “Plug in air fresheners containing fragrances such as pinene and d¼limonene can combine
                with ozone in the air to create a potentially harmful smog inside houses. Ozone is a
                common component of both urban and rural air. Researchers from the US
                Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studied what happened when the substances
                combined as they would in an indoor environment. They found that the combination
                generated formaldehyde, a probable carcinogen, as well as related compounds which
                are associated with respiratory problems. …”

                http://www.environmentalhealth.ca/s05fresheners.html

              • Fresh or Foul?Ý Air Fresheners in Public SpacesÝÝ

                UPdate Fall 2002

                Finding a public washroom is a difficult task if you are sensitive to scents and chemicals.Ý
                Most washrooms are equipped with the “dreaded air freshener.”Ý Are restaurants
                required by law to have air fresheners in their washrooms? UPdate asked someone who
                knows, NS Department of Agriculture Health Inspector Calvin Latham.Ý “There is no
                regulation requiring air fresheners,” stated Latham.Ý ‘That is purely the choice of the
                restaurant.Ý Air fresheners don’t do anything for health All we require is mechanical
                ventilation.Ý We don’t even recommend anti-bacterial soap in washrooms, just good
                hand washing.’Ý UPdate asked if this was a recent change.Ý ‘I’ve been doing this job
                for 22 years,’ Latham responded. ‘I would never look for an air freshener, it wouldn’t
                even occur to me.’ …”

                “Air fresheners don’t do anything for health.” Notice the operative word FOR. Air “fresheners”

                sure play havoc with health! Use air “fresheners” and you set in motion health HARM. — barb

                http://www.environmentalhealth.ca/fall02foul.html


            • Guide to Less Toxic Products

              http://www.lesstoxicguide.ca/



              • Air Freshener, Deodorizer, Odour Remover

                “Far from freshening air, chemical-based air fresheners and deodorizers add dangerous
                chemicals to the air we breathe. Air fresheners work by using a nerve-deadening
                chemical that interferes with our sense of smell, by coating nasal passage with an oily film,
                by masking an offending odour with a different odour, or by deactivating the odour.Ý

                “Air fresheners are made from a number of chemicals including formadehyde, a carcinogen

                and sensitizer, naphthalene, a suspected carcinogen, xylene, a neurotoxin and possible
                reproductive toxin, butane gas, a neurotoxin, cresol, ethanol, phenol and strong
                fragrances. Some solid deodorizers include the pesticide paradichlorobenzene, a
                carcinogen which can also cause liver and kidney damage. Aerosol air fresheners release
                chemicals as tiny particles which can be inhaled deeply into lungs and transferred into
                the blood stream. Plug in air fresheners break chemicals into even smaller particles.

                The key to freshening air is to remove or dilute the offending odor (by cleaning,
                ventilation or absorption), not to cover it with another chemical.
                Ý”

                Fragrance is derived from a combination of tens to hundreds of petrochemicals.

                Fragrances pollute! Perfumes Pollute! Air “fresheners” POLLUTE! — barb

                http://www.lesstoxicguide.ca/index.asp?fetch=household#airf

              • Found under Personal Care . . . but fragrances are added to not only personal

                care products, but products used for cleaning and maintenance projects, and those called

                “environmental” such as air “fresheners.” — barb

                Fragrance – Synthetic fragrance is the most common ingredient found in personal
                care products. “Fragrance on a label can indicate the presence of up to 4,000 separate
                ingredients. Most or all of them are synthetic. Symptoms reported to the FDA have
                included headaches, dizziness, rashes, skin discoloration, violent coughing and
                vomiting, and allergic skin irritation. Clinical observations by medical doctors have
                shown that exposure to fragrances can affect the central nervous system, causing
                depression, hyperactivity, irritability, inability to cope, and other behavioral changes.”
                (Home Safe Home, Debra Lynn Dadd). Fragrance is a known trigger of asthma. Many
                of the compounds in fragrance are suspected or proven carcinogens. Phthalates in
                perfumes are known hormone disruptors. In 1989 the US National Institute of
                Occupational Safety and Health evaluated 2,983 fragrance chemicals for health effects.
                They identified 884 of them as toxic substances. The US Environmental Protection Agency
                found that 100% of perfumes contain toluene, which can cause liver, kidney and brain
                damage as well as damage to a developing fetus. “

                And to prove all of this, just turn to EHN’s FDA Petition 99P-1340. — barb

                http://www.lesstoxicguide.ca/index.asp?fetch=personal

              MCS America

              http://www.mcs-america.org/customairfreshenerletter.doc

            • June Russell’s Health Facts

              Chemical Sensitivities and Air Fresheners

              http://www.jrussellshealth.com/chemsensair.html


          • Air Pollutants

            http://www.arb.ca.gov/health/health.htm


          • Air Pollution

            European Environmental Bureau

            http://www.eeb.org/activities/air/main.htm

              EU Chemicals Policy

              “Tens of thousands of industrial chemicals are currently on the market and also used in
              products without having been checked for potential effects on human health and the
              environment!

              “Until now the European Union has not managed to regulate the introduction and use of
              all these substances on the market. The legislation has managed to control only a
              small fraction of them, thereby exposing the public and the environment to ongoing and
              partly unknown threats and actual diseases. …”

              http://www.eeb.org/activities/chemicals/main.htm

            — end, air “fresheners” (Oh, how I wish it were the end of them!) —


          • Air Pollution – Clearing The Air – A Dozen Things You Can Do

            We can learn a thing or twelve from our Canadian neighbors! — barb

            http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/main/newsrel/fisc0001/june/ib119.htm

          • Air Pollution

            Earth Crash Earth Spirit

            Series of articles on two long pages — barb

            http://eces.org/ec/pollution/air.shtml

          • Air Pollution Glossary

            Bay Area Air Quality Management District

            http://www.baaqmd.gov/pie/aqgloss.htm

          • Air Pollution, Health Effects of

            NO ROOM TO BREATHE: Air Pollution and Primary Care Medicine

            Jefferson H Dickey, MD; A Project of Greater Boston PSR

            http://www.psr.org/breathe.htm

          • Air Pollution in New York City

            ENSCI 111 Lab 11

            http://www.qc.edu/EES/ENSCI111/lab8/

          • Air Pollution, Indoor & Outdoor

            Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s

            ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues) in Science Project

            http://www.lbl.gov/Education/ELSI/pollution-main.html

          • {Air pollution info]Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Online

            “What triggers vasomotor rhinitis?

            “Irritants that can trigger vasomotor rhinitis include cigarette smoke, strong odors and
            fumes including perfume, hair spray, other cosmetics, laundry detergents, cleaning
            solutions, … “

            http://allergy.mcg.edu/Advice/rhin.html

          • Air Pollution

            European Environmental Bureau

            http://www.eeb.org/activities/air/main.htm

              EU Chemicals Policy

              “Tens of thousands of industrial chemicals are currently on the market and also used in
              products without having been checked for potential effects on human health and the
              environment!

              “Until now the European Union has not managed to regulate the introduction and use of
              all these substances on the market. The legislation has managed to control only a
              small fraction of them, thereby exposing the public and the environment to ongoing and
              partly unknown threats and actual diseases. …”

              http://www.eeb.org/activities/chemicals/main.htm

            Air Pollution and Children’s Health

            California’s OEHHA

            http://www.oehha.ca.gov/public_info/facts/airkids.html


          • Air Pollution – Clearing The Air – A Dozen Things You Can Do

            We can learn a thing or twelve from our Canadian neighbors! — barb

            http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/main/newsrel/fisc0001/june/ib119.htm

          • Air Pollution

            Earth Crash Earth Spirit

            Series of articles on two long pages — barb

            http://eces.org/ec/pollution/air.shtml

          • Air Pollution Glossary

            Bay Area Air Quality Management District

            http://www.baaqmd.gov/pie/aqgloss.htm

          • Air Pollution, Health Effects of

            NO ROOM TO BREATHE: Air Pollution and Primary Care Medicine

            Jefferson H Dickey, MD; A Project of Greater Boston PSR

            http://www.psr.org/breathe.htm

          • Air Pollution in New York City

            ENSCI 111 Lab 11

            http://www.qc.edu/EES/ENSCI111/lab8/

          • Air Pollution, Indoor & Outdoor

            Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s

            ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues) in Science Project

            http://www.lbl.gov/Education/ELSI/pollution-main.html


            • Air Quality – outdoor

              Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

              Environmental Energies Tecnologies Division

              http://eetd.lbl.gov/AQ.html

            • The Indoor Environment Department

              Missing in action — at least as far as my eyes could tell: fragrances, pesticides. — barb 4/02

              http://eetd.lbl.gov/IE.html


            The Green Guide

            10 Steps To Reduce Risks If You’re Pregnant

            http://www.thegreenguide.com

          • The Independent

            By Kate Hilpern ; 09 November 2004

            ” … Last month, research found that mothers and their babies are being made ill by

            products including air fresheners, polish, deodorants and hair sprays. Dr Alex Farrow of
            Brunel University, who led a study of 10,000 women, found that frequent use appeared

            to increase the risk of diarrhoea, earache and other symptoms in infants, as well as
            headaches and even depression in mothers. ‘What the study doesn’t tell us is why and
            how the fragrances of these products cause these symptoms,’ she says. ‘But what it does
            suggest is that there is an effect. Since more than 40 per cent of families use air fresheners
            regularly, this is a significant finding.’ … “

            http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health_medical/story.jsp?story=580858

          • ZERO Air Pollution

            Concentrates on leaf blowers and the harm they cause to health. How about fragrances? — barb

            http://www.zapla.org/

            Alkalize For Health

            http://www.alkalizeforhealth.net/index.htm

            Alternatives


            • ALTERNATIVE CAREERS FAIR: STUDENT ORGANIZING GUIDE

              http://goodworksfirst.org/careerfair/careerindex.html

            • Alternatives that work for me . . .


            • Consumer products . . .


              • Baking soda, Bon Ami (free/clear, just plain ol’ Bon Ami), club soda, lemon juice,
                jojoba oil, olive oil, salt, sun, vinegar . . .

                Drain clearer and cleaner: I pour baking soda down the drain then add vinegar and let

                it sit . . . then 15 minutes or so later flush with hot water; use weekly and you’ll not have a
                problem in the first place.

              • Sungold Soap

                “Specializing in low odor, unscented soap with a minimum of ingredients.

                Extremely well tolerated.”

                SUNGOLD SOAP PO BOX 17342 TUCSON, ARIZONA 85731-7342 (520) 245-1883

                http://www.sungoldsoap.com/index.html

                And . . . Sungold Soap — Soap that is purely soap.

                http://www.sungoldsoap.com/absorbtion.html

              • Personal care products:

                Soap: several different ones, including:

                Toothpaste: baking soda, or Tom’s of Maine without fluoride.

              Health care


              • Acupuncture

              • Chiropractic



          • American Lung Association

            Indoor Air Pollution Fact Sheet Household Products

            What Are They?

            “The household cleaning agents, personal care products, pesticides, paints, hobby
            products, and solvents that make our lives so easy are also sources of hundreds of
            potentially harmful chemicals. The range of household products that contain potentially
            harmful substances that contribute to indoor air pollution is wide-reaching and
            diverse. Some of these products release contaminants into the air right away; others
            do so gradually, over a period of time. The harmful components in many household and
            personal care products can cause dizziness, nausea, allergic reactions, and eye, skin,
            and respiratory tract irritation; some can cause cancer. When you use these products,
            make sure that you are in an area with adequate ventilation.”

            I say, practice the adage: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. There are safer products to use and safer methods for cleaning and prettying up oneself.

            This page contains important information and it surely is worth reading. Unfortunately, the
            unsuspecting public is led to believe that the problems given are simply associated with “Aerosol
            spray products,… Chlorine bleach and Rug and upholstery cleaners.” Again, you get
            information on adverse health effects of fragrances from the ALA by innuendo.

            This page conveniently ignores the fact that our modern petrochemically derived FRAGRANCES
            have been crafted to quickly volatilize, and to waft further and last longer on the ambient air.
            It matters not whether FRAGRANCES are used as colognes or perfume, or are found in an
            enormous variety of personal care products, or in our household and janitorial cleaning and
            maintenance products, fragrances can cause the health problems listed. A real hasardous household

            polluter is fabric softeners. Not only does its scent and other chemicals pollute the fabric in the
            laundry facility and the home or building housing that laundry area, but those chemicals pollute
            the outdoor air for blocks around while in use in the laundry. Then they pollute the air —
            AND OUR BODIES — when the laudered item is worn or used.

            FRAGRANCES are made to become one with the air we all must breathe, regardless of stage of
            development or heath. ONLY YOU can make a difference by purchasing safer, cleaner products. — barb

            http://www.lungusa.org/air/household_products.html


            • Asthma Triggers

              Now here, you should expect that ALA would add the topic, FRAGRANCE, as a category

              head with a list of personal care products, as well as household and janitorial cleaning and
              maintenance products following as bulleted items. But, it seems the good ol’ ALA does not wish
              to clearly inform the public that fragrances are combinatioins of toxic chemicals truly capable
              of causing, exacerbating or triggering asthma, and other diseases. The closest they come to
              giving a clue to the harmful effects of these volatilizing, air polluting products is under Household
              Products, where they do list “cleaners.” Remember folks, just because the ALA doesn’t tell
              you the truth about our modern fragrances, doesn’t mean that fragrances don’t cause asthma.

              Got asthma? Do your own test. Remove all scented products from your daily life. There are
              alternatives that are not only safer for you, but all the people around you, plus safer for our
              environment. Keep a diary. If you encounter fabric softeners on the ambient air, and you get
              asthma, record it. If you encounter a perfumed individual, and you get asthma, record it. ETC.
              Not all fragrances will trigger all asthmatic attacks for all people, but it is important to note when
              such an exposure does cause asthma.

              Next, take your self-survey, along with a printout of EHN’s FDA Petition’s Perfume Analysis
              Summary, to your doctor. You’ve just begun what could be a long, drawn-out educational
              process. IF you are having asthmatic attacks because other people at work, school, healthcare
              facility, public places and places of worship use and wear fragrances and you need accommodation,
              check out EHN’s page, “Take Heart!”. Three you will find suggestions for accommodation
              that have actually worked for others. — barb; last checked, after many, many letters sent with
              documentation: Dec. 1, 2003

              http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/astastrig.html#household

              Memorial Lung Center

              Asthma Triggers you may not be aware of from A – Z

              Lists perfume under P. — barb

              http://www.qualityoflife.org/services/LungCenter/AsthmaEdu.cfm


          • Anderson Labs of West Hartford, Vermont 05084, USA.

            http://www.andersonlaboratories.com/




            — end to Air Pollution subcategory, air “fresheners” —

          Air line travel and Oxygen

          A Comparative Analysis of Arranging In-Flight Oxygen

          Aboard Commercial Air Carriers*

          http://www.medscape.com/ACCP/chest/1999/v115.n04/ch1154.01.stol/ch1154.01.stol-01.html



          Air Pollutants

          SEC. 112. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS defined by Congress

          by CAS # and Chemical name ( scroll down to list)

          http://www.epa.gov/oar/caa/caa112.txt


          Air Pollution — Environmed Research Inc.

          “All our big environmental problems are built from many small,

          personal decisions – little mistakes that add up over time. If there

          is a solution, it will emerge from the collective value of millions of

          better decisions made by individuals all over the globe. The

          environmental action plan is to think globally and act locally – it

          does make sense.”

          http://www.nutramed.com/environment/airpollution.htm



          Air Pollution Page — Environmental Working Group

          http://www.ewg.org/air/


          Air Pollution from paints and finishes

          Earth Tech

          http://www.earthtechinc.com/whynontox.html#Medical Reasons:




        • San Francisco Opera’s Fake Fog

          I can assure one and all that there is more than fake fog polluting the air of the San Francisco
          Opera House. So many friends and I can no longer attend the opera due to all of the fragrance
          products used and worn by the attendees. Same is true, by the bye, regarding the theater. Talk
          about indoor air pollution! “Clean” and “fresh” are not properties of petrochemical derived scents,
          they are merely words chosen for use by the industry advertising and public relations campaigns.


          People use scented products on faith. Faith that an unregulated industry has thoroughly tested
          its products. Thus far the only testing that I know of has been for dermatological effects of the
          user. I’d like to see evidence of “thorough testing” for respiratory, neurological and systemic
          effects for users and nonusers. I’d also like to see truthful and clearer labeling. But, until
          such time that fragrances are proved safe for marketing, I’d like to see the FDA require its alert
          to be affixed to all labels of products released to market without substantiation of safety:

          “WARNING: The safety of this product has not been determined.” Fragrances can
          adversely affect the health of users and untold others. There is a vested interest here folks . . .
          check the economy of the flavors and fragrance industry and then grab a look at the economy
          of the pharmaceutical industry. See “FDA Authority Over Cosmetics”. — barb


        • Scientific Instrument Services (papers on air pollution)

          Index that includes the following papers. — barb

          http://www.sisweb.com/index/referenc/apnote.htm


          • The Analysis of Perfumes and their Effect on Indoor Air Pollution

            By John J. Manura

            Presented at EAS, Somerset, NJ., November 1998

            http://www.sisweb.com/referenc/applnote/app-73.htm

          • Volatile Organics Present in Recycled Air Aboard a Commercial Airliner

            By Joseph Brady, Santford Overton and John J. Manura

            ” …These air samples show that the public is constantly in contact with a wide variety of
            potentially harmful VOC’s due to cleaning supplies, lubricants and fuel by-products.
            These are an unwelcome addition to the flavor and fragrance compounds one
            expects to encounter around foods. In addition to the levels of biologicals trapped in
            closed-in areas such as airline cabins, it is apparent that organic compounds should also
            be of concern. Perhaps it is time for the airlines to do a better job on the quality of air
            found inside their aircraft.”

            Notice that while “flavor and fragrance compounds” are referenced, these volatile,

            petrochemical-derived substances are associated only with food. Ignored are fragrance products

            used by staff and fellow passengers. Fragrances pollute the air with volatilizing chemicals

            emanating from clothing laundered using scented detergents and fabric softeners, as well as

            from perfume, cologne, aftershave and other scented personal care products. Another source of
            fragrance pollution are the restroom air “fresheners.” Is it safe to assume they are included above,
            under “cleaning supplies”? Whether or not a restroom is used, all the people on the plane are
            subjected to those toxic “freshener” chemicals that precede fellow passengers as a bow wave
            upon their return to their seats. Leaving a plane, passengers have taken that load of scent-
            polluted air with them, clinging to their hair, body and clothing. No wonder so many people have
            cold- or flu-like symptoms following a flight. Fragrances are respiratory irritants and
            sensitizers. I’d say it is past time for airlines to improve air quality. — barb

            http://www.sisweb.com/referenc/applnote/app-26-a.htm

          — end air pollution section, which included air “fresheners,” above —

        Air Purifiers/Filters

        Like so many other products and/or services for the MCSer, the “best” air purifier is a personal
        choice. This info is provided as a tool. I hope you find something that works for you. But, as
        you consider air purifiers, also steep yourself in information on ozone generators, which are
        not healthy for those with respiratory distress. See EHN’s section on Ozone Generators

        ehnlinx/o.htm#Generators— barb


        Also visit EHN’s Consumer Products

        (ehnlinx/c.htm#Consumer)



        Air Quality Resources


          EHN’s Take Heart! — Fragrance-FREE access and accommodation measures

          ehnhompg/takheart.htm

          You’ll want to visit our Government Links page, on which we

          provide many links to EPA sites

          ehnglinx.htm#E


        • Indoor Air …

          EPA: “Studies have found that levels of several organics average 2 to 5 times higher
          indoors than outdoors. During and for several hours immediately after certain activities,
          such as paint stripping, levels may be 1,000 times background outdoor levels.

          http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/insidest.html


          Also, contact your local Air Resources Board.



        • ALA’sNew Tip Sheet – Y2002: Asthma – Limit Exposure to Triggers

          Fifth on the list . . . I’d make this FIRST! . . . “Household irritants, including dust, cleaning
          products, and perfume” AND, I would add PESTICIDES. Remember they are also scented. — barb

          http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/atipsheet.html

        • Achieving Healthy Indoor Air– ALA


          “Supplement to American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine,”

          Volume 156, Number 3; September 1997 (part 2of2 parts) ISSN 1073-449X

          “Control of pollution sources is incomplete if the odors from the

          occupants are not minimized. Perfumes are among the most difficult
          to control since they are perceived by their users as
          pleasurable. Personal rights and preferences for perfumed products
          must be evaluated against the discomfort that scents cause for
          some people. The odoriferous materials are highly volatile synthetic
          chemicals; in effect, they contribute to the total VOCs. Scented
          personal products are not limited to perfumes; they include
          residual scents on clothing from detergents and fabric softeners,
          soaps, shampoos, deodorants, skin lotions, and cosmetics. The only
          successful method of control is to eliminate these odors, either
          by avoiding their use, as with perfumes, or by using unscented
          products.”

          Two-bits’ worth by barb: Let me assure everyone, it is not mere “discomfort that scents
          cause for some people,” although, they too, should not have to be forced to inhale another person’s
          choice of odor. But for the already chemically injured — POISONED — it can be a life and death
          situation. Now, how can any employer, school administrator, healthcare administrator and
          professional or executive of government entities grant the right to odorovect toxic chemicals
          from personal care products over another’s right to breathe? I ask you.

          http://www.lungusa.org/press/association/asnairq.html


          If not available through the ALA, then go to:

          http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/3/S33

            ” More than 17 million Americans suffer from asthma, which is the seventh-ranking

            chronic condition in America. ” © 2000 American Lung Association.

            http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/



      • Aerias

        “Better health through indoor air quality awareness”

        http://www.aerias.org/cached_document_58.htm

      • Air Resources Board: California

        http://www.arb.ca.gov/html/brochure/brochure.htm



        • 50 Things You Can Do for Cleaner Air

          http://www.arb.ca.gov/html/brochure/50things.htm


        • Air Pollution Sources, Health Effects, and Controls

          http://www.arb.ca.gov/health/health.htm



        • Bay Area Air Quality Management District

          http://www.baaqmd.gov/

            It’s Personal!

            My encounter with BAAQMD when I wanted to log a complaint about fabric softeners.

            by Barb Wilkie; The New Reactor, Vol 6, No. 2: March – August 1996

            newreact/itspersl.htm


        • Burning Issues – A project of Clean Air Revival

          http://burningissues.org/

        • EnvirPure

          A series of articles, starting with “UV Lights may fight ‘sick building’ syndrome; 5/26/99.”

          Also look for “Dust, cats and other indoor irritants contribute to asthma; 1/20/00.” In there you will read:


            ” . . . Other factors that fit in this category are formaldehyde fumes and fragrances

            found in personal care and household products.

            “As for pesticides, houseplant spores or material from domestic or wild rodents,

            the research is still inadequate to determine if they are a major cause or

            aggravator of asthma. . . .”

          — barb

          http://www.pureinc.com/ThirdPartyArticles.html

        • … Achieving Healthy Indoor Air

          “Specific steps on how to prevent indoor pollutants from adversely affecting asthmatics
          and those with allergies were part of an ALA/ATS report released as a special

          supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical
          Care Medicine.

          http://www.thoracic.org/news/atsnews/news1097/story2.html


            ” More than 17 million Americans suffer from asthma, which is the seventh-ranking

            chronic condition in America. ” © 2000 American Lung Association.

            http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/


        • CCOHS – Canadian Centre for Occupational and Health Safety

          Indoor Air Quality: A Legitimate OSH Concern

          “… The reason IAQ problems are difficult to determine is that building occupants are
          exposed to not one but several adverse conditions. For example, you might not think
          that the slight emissions from furniture, carpets, photocopiers, or the perfume worn by
          your co-workers could be harmful, but in combination they can affect your health.
          Again, these effects are impossible to trace accurately, but the condition does have a
          name: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS). …”

          http://www.ccohs.ca/headlines/text27.html

        • Consumer Products and Smog

          http://www.arb.ca.gov/html/brochure/consprod.htm



        Air Samples


        • Eighth Annual International Symposium on

          Man and His Environment in Health and Disease

          The Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollution

          February 22-25, 1990 Look at that date folks! How many millions of us could have been
          spared our health — our lives, for too many have died prematurely! — had our government agencies
          supported public health to the extent that they have instead supported industry? — barb

          http://www.aehf.com/articles/1990symp.html

        • Lipsey and Associates, Inc.

          “… takes air samples in homes and offices in all 50 states, for homeowners, businesses,

          insurance companies, and others. This, along with other types of sampling done by
          Lipsey and Associates, Inc., allows them to determine whether or not the locations are
          contaminated. Lipsey and Associates, Inc. reviews many cases for attorneys, and
          provides oral reports within 48 hours. Lipsey and Associates, Inc. also serves as expert
          witnesses in court.”

          http://www7.bcity.com/lipsey77/

        • San Francisco’s Air Quality Plan

          Sustainability Plan for San Francisco – October 1996

          Note: SF looks at air quality INdoors and out! — barb

          http://www.ci.sf.ca.us/sfenvironment/environment/sustain/airqulty.htm

        • “Scientists to sample world’s cleanest air”

          Monday, March 15, 1999

          http://www.enn.com/news/enn-stories/1999/03/031599/cleanair_2110.asp



        The indoor air we breathe: a public health problem of the 90’s.

        by L. Christine Oliver and Bruce W. Shackleton

        http://www.eisc.ca/air-we-breth.htm



      • It All Adds Up to Cleaner Air

        EPA’s collaborative effort to improve outdoor air

        Perhaps those of us also interested in indoor air, could learn a trick or two from this page. — barb

        http://www.epa.gov/otaq/traq/traqpedo/italladd/



      • Students breathing easier

        Spray products banned in some Decatur public schools

        myinky; By The Associated Press; January 14, 2003

        http://www.myinky.com/ecp/local_news/article/0,1626,ECP_745_1672242,00.html

      • Airways


        • Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health!

          http://www.occuphealth.fi/e/dept/sjweh/index.htm


          • Consensus report – Airway allergy and worklife.

            Malmberg P; Scand J Work Environ Health 2001;27(6):422-425.

            ” …In addition, asthma is worsened by irritant exposures from dusts and fine

            particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide gas, cold air and exercise, strong scents, and
            environmental tobacco smoke. Common detergents and cleaning agents may also
            pose a threat. …”

            Folks, remember,”strong scents” is a way of saying perfume, cologne, aftershave, lotions,

            deodorants, hair care products, fabric softeners, detergents, trash bags, etc., etc. — barb

            http://www.occuphealth.fi/cgi-bin/sjweh/abst_testi.pl?key=2001|6|422–|1

        • UCB Parents Health & Medical Advice – Asthma & Allergies

          Advice and recommendations from the UCB Parents mailing list. This page is brought to you by

          UC Berkeley Parents Network

          http://parents.berkeley.edu/advice/health/asthma.html

        http://web.archive.org/web/20000902230848/http://my.webmd.com/content/dmk/dmk_article_5462492

        –end section on Air —


        Airplanes/Airports

        >

        top of page



      Alaska

      Also see EHN’s section on the Valdez spill

      ehnlinx/v.htm#Vladez

      Alcohol

      Remember, the EPA classifies disinfectants as pesticides. — barb

      See EPA’s What Are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

      http://www.epa.gov/oppad001/ad_info.htm


      • Alcohol -The Dangers of Alcohol Use (light and moderate consumption)

        June Russell’s Health Facts

        http://www.jrussellshealth.com/alcohol.html

      • Alcohol Fetal Syndrome

        Serious question: Has anyone ever looked at the role played by synthetic scents?

        Alcohol is a large percentage of fragrance products. — barb



      • Alcohol in fragrances

        Let’s take a gander at the words of Scented Products Education and Information
        Association of Canada (SPEIAC)
        in their ad published following their press conference
        in Halifax, Nova Scotia, June 20, 2000. — barb

        COMMON SENSE ABOUT SCENTS – fragrance industry ad in Canada

        http://www.scentedproducts.on.ca/hdnad.jpg

        You’ll note that the ad states in part: “The composition of perfumes hasn’t changed much in

        hundreds of years. They contain primarily water and alcohol – of the same type and purity we
        drink in beverages — as well as essential fragrance oils.”


        Don’t ignore that line about not changing much in “hundreds of years,” but for now, I ask

        that you notice that line about water and alcohol.

        So, let’s look at alcohol. What does Blue Cross of California have to say —


          What are some of the health-related problems associated with alcoholism?

          “According to the American Cancer Society, there is evidence of a

          connection between heavy alcohol use and increased risk for cancer, with

          2-4% of all cancer cases thought to be related to alcohol. A strong

          association exists between alcohol use and cancers of the mouth, pharynx,

          and esophagus. Still under study is the association of alcohol with liver,

          breast, and colorectal cancers. Alcoholism has also been associated with

          suppression of the immune system. Immune suppression makes chronic

          alcohol abusers more susceptible to various infectious diseases, and

          possibly cancer.”

        Now, let’s visit National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and their

        Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

        http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/pgdstart.html

        . . . and look up


          Ethyl alcohol – CAS # 64-17-5

            Synonyms & Trade Names: Alcohol, Cologne spirit, Ethanol, EtOH,

          Grain alcohol

             Exposure Routes: inhalation, ingestion, skin and/or eye contact

             Symptoms: irritation eyes, skin, nose; headache, drowsiness, fatigue,

          narcosis; cough; liver damage; anemia; reproductive, teratogenic effects

             Target Organs: Eyes, skin, respiratory system, central nervous system,

          liver, blood, reproductive system”

          Or, we can look up the couple of chemicals listed on the label above, on Material Data Saftey Sheets (MSDS):


          — barb


      • Alcohols (Ethyl & Methyl Alcohol and Ethylene Glycol)

        http://www.kumc.edu/research/medicine/pharmacology/CAI/webCAI/ff87.htm

      • Alcohols, Phenols and Ethers

        http://ull.chemistry.uakron.edu/genobc/slide.html$Chapter=/genobc/Chapter_13/&Last=43&Slide=31

      • Cancer Research America, Dr. James Coleman

        “…Alcohol is the main ingredient in many perfumes, fragrances and colognes, according to the
        manufacturer¼s label on the containers. There is definitive scientific and medical proof that
        alcohol is carcinogenic and that it can cause breast cancer in humans when ingested (4, 13). As
        reported in a National Cancer Institute publication, there is a causal link between cancer of the
        oral cavity and the „long-term use of mouthwashes high in alcohol content¾ — indicating the effect
        of topical application rather than systemic exposure since mouthwashes are not swallowed by
        most people (10).


        “There is an abundance of scientific evidence showing that alcohol and other ingredients used in
        cosmetics can enter the bloodstream through the skin (15, 16). Alcoholic perfumes, fragrances and
        colognes are applied directed to the breast by some women. In such instances, many breast cells
        at the site where most malignant tumors occur receive a dose of alcohol that is greater than
        what would be experienced with heavy drinking. …”

        Go to Dr. Coleman’s page, Education, to read the rest of his comments and link to the footnotes. — barb

        http://www.cancerresearchamerica.org/edu.html

      • Consumer Alert-Isopropyl Alcohol

        by Marj Melchiors

        “… Avoid products with words such as propyl, methyl, butyl, benzene, toluene,

        xylene, and styrene in their ingredient lising. These would signify that they are

        in the isopropyl alcohol family. …”

        http://www.allnaturalcosmetics.com/Isopropyl%20Alcohol.htm

      • Cure For Cancer

        info about Dr. Hulda Regehr Clark’s work

        http://www.lightsv.org/cancer.htm

        FUSELS ALCOHOLS

        http://www.beer-brewing.com/brewers-yeast/brewers-yeast-fusel-alcohols.htm

      • Hormones and alcohol equally risky

        “TORONTO, Sep 29, 1999 (The Canadian Press via COMTEX) — Women who

        drink two bottles of beer a day should be just as worried about increasing their

        breast-cancer risk as those on hormone replacement therapy. …”

        http://www.kron.com/Global/story.asp?s=12178

      • Isopropyl Alcohol

        From: The Emergency Medicine and Primary Care Home Page

        http://www.embbs.com/cr/alc/alc5.html

      • ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL

        University of California – MSDS System

        http://chem-courses.ucsd.edu/CoursePages/Uglabs/MSDS/isopropyl.alcohol.-kodak.html

      • Isopropyl Alcohol; CAS Number: 67-63-0

        “There is an increased risk of cancer associated with the manufacturing of Isopropyl Alcohol.”

        http://www.ndcrt.org/data/EPA_Chemical_Fact_Sheets/Isopropyl-Alcohol-_18k_

      • Isopropyl Alcohol

        Zarc International, Inc. — “It is not a cancer causing agent. … Not All Alcohols are Safe”

        http://www.zarc.com/english/other_sprays/nonflam/isopropyl.html

      • ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL (90 – 100%)

        MSDS Number: I8840 — Effective Date: 07/21/00

        http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/i8840.htm

      • Living with Alcohol(drinking alcohol)

        by Steven Wm. Fowkes

        http://www.ceri.com/alcohol.htm

      • Pathophysiology and Teratology of Pre-natal Alcohol Toxicity (drinking alcohol)

        http://www.adopting.org/DrJane/ov2pathophys.html

      — end alcohols —

    Aldehydes and Solvents



    Aldrich Flavors and Fragrances

    You must register to use this site, but it is free. — barb

    http://www.sigma-aldrich.com/saws.nsf/Home?OpenFrameset



    Alerts

    Allergy

    Also see Asthma

    ehnlinx/a.htm#Asthma

    Those who live with fragrance-sensitization realize that they do not suffer an “allergy,” but

    most of the world thinks only in terms of allergy and so often you will hear the expression, “I am
    allergic to perfume (or fragrance).” Regardless of how it’s phrased, we know that perfumes
    cause, exacerbate and trigger, many allergy-like symptoms, hence the confusion. If you have
    asthma, along with your “allergies,” you may be interested in this brochure. — barb

    Now onto the info on allergy. . .

      Airway allergy and worklife.

      Malmberg P

      Scand J Work Environ Health 2001;27(6):422-425.

      They state, “strong scents.” — barb

      http://www.occuphealth.fi/cgi-bin/sjweh/abst_testi.pl?key=2001|6|422–|1

    • AllAllergies

      http://allallergy.net/allallergy/index.html



    • Allergic Rhinitis, Top 10 Tips for Addressing

      Business & Health

      Action Items for Employers

      Corporate and clinical experts who participated in a Business & Health roundtable agreed

      on 10 practical tactics for employers who recognize the impact of allergies on job performance.

      “… 4. Establish a policy addressing strong odors from such sources as perfumes.

      Even if such odors contain irritants rather than allergens per se, some employees

      may have a low threshold for distress. …”

      I do believe they ought to know that “irritant” used to describe a chemical is not to be

      confused with an irritant that is an emotional annoyance. When talking about perfume,

      think of irritant as defined in your Oxford Dictionary: POISON. Although,

      I must admit, I have found that management teams that prefer to poison the air with perfumed

      products do cause distress, as used above. Distress as defined by American Heritage Dictionary

      means: A STATE OF PHYSICAL OR MENTAL SUFFERING, PAIN, MISERY, HURT,

      AGONY, ANGUISH,WOE, AFFLICTION. Chemical irritants — poisons — cause physical injury. — barb

      http://www.businessandhealth.com/hostedfiles/features/allergiesatwork/consumer/article01.htm


      • Allergies: Sniffles, Sneezes and Suffering

        Business & Health

        The effects of allergies and their treatment go way beyond sneezing and a stuffy nose, impacting many aspects of sufferers’ personal and professional lives.

        By Rebecca Voelker

        http://www.businessandhealth.com/hostedfiles/features/allergiesatwork/physician/article02.htm

      • The Hidden Cost of Allergies

        The greatest productivity loss from allergic rhinitis comes not from employees

        taking sick days but from reduced performance among those who come to work.

        By Shelly Reese; Business & Health

        http://www.businessandhealth.com/hostedfiles/features/allergiesatwork/physician/article03.htm

      • Allergens in the Workplace

        Allergens can emerge in settings that appear clean, well maintained and
        chemical free…at home and at work.

        By Helen Lippman, Contributing Editor

        “… The next time you encounter the guy down the hall who always seems to
        have a runny nose and red, watery eyes, don’t assume it’s an intractable cold,
        a bout of seasonal hay fever or a stubborn case of the flu. Office workers
        may not be exposed to heavy chemicals in spray paints, enzymes in
        detergents or the red cedar dust in lumber, but allergists now recognize that
        office buildings can harbor a number of allergens or irritants. A sneezing,
        sniffling employee could be reacting to copy machine toner, a colleague’s
        perfume,
        airborne spores from mold and fungi in the circulation system,
        cockroaches or other indoor irritants or allergens. …

        “… The first indication that something’s amiss usually comes when employees
        report what they believe to be allergicãand job-relatedãsymptoms. But
        just getting workers to the point where they’re willing to come forward
        requires deliberate action. ‘Employers need to educate supervisors and other
        employees,’ Grammer emphasizes. ‘They need to be told that if they
        develop teary eyes, wheezing, sneezing or other related symptoms, they may
        be allergic to something in the workplace and need to tell someone. And tell
        them they don’t have to worry about being fired,’ she adds.

        “Keeping workers quiet or dismissing tentative complaints is a highly
        ineffective strategy that’s likely to deflate employee morale. Delay also
        significantly boosts health risks and subsequent costs. …

        “… ‘If workers with allergic symptoms are removed from the site or the
        offending substance is removed within the first six months to a year,’
        Grammer reports, ‘they’re unlikely to get permanent asthma. If exposure is
        much longer than that and they develop abnormal pulmonary function, only one
        in four cases of asthma will go away.’ … “

        http://www.businessandhealth.com/hostedfiles/features/allergiesatwork/physician/article04.htm


    • Allergy

      Volume 57 Issue s72 Page 30 – August 2002

      Environmental urban factors (air pollution and allergens) and the rising trends

      in allergic respiratory diseases

      G. D’Amato

      http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showAbstract&doi=10.1034/j.1398-9995.57.s72.5.x

    • AllergyAlertCook.com

      You can order “Allergy Alert Cookbook – The World’s Best From East To West”

      http://www.ALLERGYALERTCOOK.com/default.asp

    • Allergy New Zealand

      http://www.allergyclinic.co.nz

        Allergies

        http://www.allergy.org.nz/allergies/

      • Asthma and Allergies

        “Asthma is a condition characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways. The
        inflammation can be caused by a number of factors, including viral infections or long-
        term exposure to a chemical irritant, but is also commonly associated with an immune
        system reaction to allergens. …”

        Folks, when you read, “chemical irritant” think beyond just tobacco smoke, or paint fumes to
        the chemical irritants you most often come in contact with . . . FRAGRANCE. That innocuous
        sounding word is a label for concoctions of tens to hundreds of inadequately tested chemicals and
        they are added to a myrad of products. Where is the testing for adverse effects upon inhalation? — barb

        http://www.allergy.org.nz/allergies/asthma/

      • Reactions to Cosmetics and Skin Care Products

        By Dr Vincent St Aubyn Crump, Auckland Allergy Clinic

        “It is estimated that the average adult uses at least 7 different skin care products

        each day, so it¼s not surprising that reactions to these products are very common.
        Reactions can be seen after the first application or after years of use. …”

        This piece also contains info on plants that cause allergies, so watch out for “natural.” — barb

        http://www.allergy.org.nz/allergies/contact/


    • Allergy Research Group

      http://www.allergyresearchgroup.com


    • Allergy, Sensitivity & Environmental Health Association

      “ASEHA is a voluntary organisation, it is a self-help support group for people
      with allergy, food intolerance, multiple chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue
      syndrome, hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder. ASEHA was formed
      in1984 to bring allergy sufferers together to share information, for
      encouragement and mutual support. Only another allergy sufferer can truly
      understand the social consequences and the misery of allergy.

      http://www.asehaqld.org.au/


    • Allergy tips from a fellow allergy sufferer

      http://stores.us.ohio-state.edu/~steen/allergy/

    • Allergy to Perfume in the Air – and similar illness due to perfume


      in the air we breathe
      – a correspondence page

      http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/perfume_corr.htm



      • Asthma: could it be caused by something at work?

        Do not overlook the fragrance chemicals in an ordinary office setting! IF the fragrance
        abusers can be noticed for any distance beyond their arm length — the industry’s standard
        “Scent Circle” area — you’ve got yourself a case of perfume pollution. Perfume causes, exacerbates
        and triggers asthma and a range of other diseases. Productivity drops when people feel sick. — barb

        http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/asthma_occup.htm


    • AllerCare Products Recall

      Remember the adage: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Only YOU can do
      something about poisoning your body, your air and the water downstream: STOP buying
      products containing petrochemically derived fragrances until the flavors and fragrance industry
      and the FDA can show us that these products are safe for the user . . . and everyone who
      comes in contact with the user. I might add, if you clean well, keep the area dry, add lots of fresh air
      and sunshine to the mix, you don’t have to rely on pesticides to control dustmites.

      Note: Links die. Try searching for “AllerCare Recall” if the links I’ve provided no longer work. — barb


      • EPA: ALLERCARE PRODUCTS RECALLED DUE TO ASTHMA AND

        RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS




        top of page



        ANNALS ONLINE

        of the New York Academy of Sciences

        You can view abstracts or full text from a list of documents. — barb


      • The Annie Appleseed Project

        Ann Fonfa, founder

        http://www.annieappleseedproject.org/index.html



      • Another Perspective: Halifax Press Releases, and statements by Betty Bridges, RN
        ehnlinx/aaprbb.htm


      • The Answer to Cancer

        Also see EHN’s section on Cancer, page C. — barb

        http://theanswertocancer.com/


      • Anthrax



        Antibacterial

        Also see EHN’s


        • Automatic dispensing units

          ehnlinx/a.htm#Automatic

        • Disinfectants

          ehnlinx/d.htm#Disinfectants

        • Spritzing Fragrance and Pesticide dispensers — Air Polluters

          ehnlinx/s.htm#Spritzing


        • ANTIBACTERIAL AGENTS

          http://www.il-st-acad-sci.org/antibio.html#bactt

        • ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS MAY BE HARMFUL, U.S. DOCTORS SUGGEST

          WebPosted Thu Jun 15 15:45:21 2000

          http://cbc.ca/cgi-bin/templates/email.cgi?/news/2000/06/15/Consumers/soap000616



          • AMA Questions Anti-Bacterial Soaps

            Optimal Wellness Center

            “Antibacterial soaps may be no more effective against germs than common soap, and could contribute to
            the threat posed by drug-resistant bacterial strains, according to a statement by the American
            Medical Association (AMA), although they stopped short of recommending that people avoid using the
            popular soaps, lotions and mouthwashes.”

            http://www.mercola.com/2000/june/17/anti_bacterial_soap.htm


            And the industry responds:

          • Discussion by American Medical Association

            a Boon to Bacteria, a Bust for Consumers, CTFA/SDA Say

            Consumers Need Antibacterial Products to Fight Disease-Causing Germs; June 14, 2000

            http://www.sdahq.org/about/news06-14-00.html

          • Joint SDA/CTFA* Statement: Unnecessary Antibiotic Prescriptions, Not Antibacterial Soaps

            Are Real Cause of Bacterial Resistance

            Consumers Need Antibacterial Products to Fight Disease-Causing Germs; July 27, 2000
            http://www.sdahq.org/about/news07-27-00.html

          Antibiotic Resistance: A Grave Threat to Human Health



          Antimicrobials



          Anti-SLAPP Project – Dedicated to First Amendment Rights

          Californian’s

          SLAPPs (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation).

          http://www.sirius.com/~casp/welcome.html

          Ants



        • AOL

          http://www.aol.com


          • AOL Signs Deal With The Fragrance Counter

            By Steven Vonder Haar; Inter@ctive WeekJune 3, 1998; 11:00 AM EDT

            ” … a subsidiary of Allou Health & Beauty Care Inc. that started selling its

            wares on AOL in 1995.”

            http://www.zdnet.com/intweek/daily/980603c.html


          • AOL and Democracy on the Internet

            “… AOL has shown the way to making money on the Internet by charging enormous

            fees to firms that want to do commerce with AOL. McChesney cites one deal in which

            AOL will receive $12 million plus a share of revenues over four years for giving the

            Fragrance Centre a prominent display on AOL’s site. One Wall Street analyst expects

            AOL to have one-half of the projected 55 million U.S. online households in 2003. …”

            http://cbc.ca/news/viewpoint/columns/rebick/rebick000113.html

          Aphorisms

          Apoptosis

          Aquatic life . . .


          • Common household fragrances may be harming aquatic wildlife, study finds – 30 Oct 2004

            “Those fragrant soaps and shampoos we casually rinse down the drain may be causing
            long-term damage to aquatic wildlife downstream by interfering with the animals’
            natural ability to eliminate toxins from their system, according to a new Stanford
            University study published by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). …”

            “…The study also has implications for human health. ‘People have these same transporters

            in the blood-brain barrier, the placenta and the intestines,’ Luckenbach explained.
            ‘Perhaps exposure to chemical fragrances could compromise the transporters, making
            it easier for pollutants to enter the brain, for example.’…”

            Also see EHN’s section on POPs, General Links, page P. — barb

            http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/newssearch.php?newsid=15643


        • Archives of Environmental Health

          Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A 1999 Consensus

          Vol. 54, No. 3, pp. 147-149

          http://www.heldref.org/html/Consensus.html

          Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A 1999 Consensus

          Available through EHN

          Architecture

          Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR)

          http://www.adpsr-norcal.org


          Architectural Features for Multi-Family Housing to Better

          ACCOMMODATE RESIDENTS with CHEMICAL and ELECTRICAL SENSITIVITIES

          By Susan Molloy, MA; EHN Advisory Board Member

          afmf



          HEALING ENVIRONMENTS: PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL, EMOTIONAL AND

          PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN ARCHITECTURE THAT PROMOTE HEALTH

          by Anou Mirkine

          BA, French Literature and Painting, Bennington College, 1979

          M.Arch., Architecture, University of New Mexico, 1996

          http://home.earthlink.net/~anouchka/Abstract.htm



          Arctic

          Potential Impacts of Proposed Oil and Gas Development on the

          Arctic Refuge’s Coastal Plain: Historical Overview and Issues of Concern

          http://www.r7.fws.gov/nwr/arctic/issues1.html



          Arizona Technology Access Program

          Arkansas Moms – Protecting Their Children, Keeping Their Homes Safe

          “Ask yourself the following:


            If you knew it was poison, would you still buy it?

            If we could show you a better, safer way, would you listen?

            We can. Will you?

            We are mommies on a mission to save families – one life at a time

            by simply switching stores for better, safer, non-toxic products

            and teaching others to do the same!

          http://www.arkansasmoms.7p.com/index.htm

        • Aroma of Christ Ministry

          MY MCS JOURNEY

          By Janine Ridings

          http://www.believersnet.com/janine.htm

          Aromatherapy – Aromacology

          For people already sensitized to fragrances, these touted safer uses of fragrance can also be
          terribly problematic. Personally, I’ve been made extraordinarily ill by “safer, essential oils.” If
          you are going in public, leave all the scents at home. Remember, you share the air! — barb


          Arsenic

          Also see, EHN’s General Links, page C / CCA

          ehnlinx/c.htm#CCA




          Art / Supplies


          Note: It has come to my attention that “Many early childhood classroom teachers have used
          shaving cream as a sensory play material in their classrooms over the years. …”

          May I suggest that before using shaving cream for art projects are play materials, you check the
          labels. I’d also like to suggest looking for safe alternatives, one of which may be Aubrey Organics. — barb

          http://www.aubrey-organics.com/product1.cfm?product_id=406

        • Art and Craft Materials Institute, Inc., The

            [Thanks! to Lassen Technologies for this information.]

            http://www.lassentech.com/eimisc.html

            Tests art materials for contents, and sets standards and

            ASTM labels for products.

            715 Boylston Street

            Boston, MA 02116

            (617)266-6800


          Art Hazards

          California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment

          http://www.oehha.org/education/art/index.html

        • Artists Face Unique Health and Safety Risks

          aHealthyMe

          http://www.ahealthyme.com/article/reuters/101214150

        • Artists with MCS

          Connections for a Safer World – An International Network

          http://www.citlink.net/~bhima/artists.htm

        • Arts, Crafts, and Theater Safety

          181 Thompson Street, #23 – New York, NY 10012-2586

          Telephone: (212) 777-0062 – E-Mail: ACTS@CaseWeb.Com

          http://www.caseweb.com/acts/



        • THE ART AND CREATIVE MATERIALS INSTITUTE

          Duke University Medical Center

          http://duketox.mc.duke.edu/arts_and_creative_materials_inst.htm

        • Art Resources – online list

          http://users.lmi.net/~drewid/Arts_resources_page.html


        • ArtsACCESS — a two year online conference on arts and disabilities for the arts community

          http://www.dcp.ucla.edu/nadc/conference.html



          • ArtsACCESS, The National Arts and Disability Center’s first “Online

            Virtual Conference” on the topic “Disability Art and Culture”

            will be active through December, 1998.

            You can register for this FREE conference at that address.

            http://www.dcp.ucla.edu/nadc/conference.html


        • Arts Wire

          http://artswire.org

          CHILD-SAFE ART MATERIALS

          By Ann Hallock is the editor of FAMILYFUN

          http://family.go.com/crafts/drawpaint/expert/dony0400aasafe/dony0400aasafe.html

        • California’s Office of Enviornmental Health Hazard Assessment

          GUIDELINES FOR THE SAFE USE OF ART AND CRAFT MATERIALS

          (updated December 2003)

          http://www.oehha.ca.gov/education/art/artguide.html

        • The Creative Work Fund

          http://www.haassr.org/ABTFUND.HTM



        • Dick Blick Art Materials

          “… a leader in informing artists, teachers, and

          consumers about potential hazards in the arts

          http://www.dickblick.com/info/healthsafety/default.asp

        • Exploring Emergence

          (Note: To read this active essay, you need a Java-enabled browser.)

          http://el.www.media.mit.edu/groups/el/projects/emergence/index.html




        • SCHOOL SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR ART AND INDUSTRIAL ART PROGRAMS


          http://artsnet.heinz.cmu.edu:70/0/csa/books/schools/school1.txt



          top of page


          Arthritis



          AS YOU SOW

          http://www.asyousow.org



          Articles

          EHN’s list of articles is now a separate section. It is an extensive but incomplete collection
          of articles. Some of the links may no longer work, but you should have enough info
          to contact the original source about getting a copy or where they may have it now
          available. If you learn of a new link, please inform barb via wilworks@lmi.net. Also see:

          Halifax (Fragrance Industry Press Conference and spin-offs)

          ehnlinx/articles.htm#Halifax

          EHN’s The New Reactor (newreact/nrindex.htm)

          Newspapers (ehnlinx/n.htm#Newspapers)

          OnLine News and Reference (ehnlinx/o.htm#OnLine)

          Publications (ehnlinx/p.htm#Publications)

          Stuff Happens

          The Word IS Out! (ehnhompg/wordout.htm)

          For daily health reports, also check:


          • Reuters Health

            http://www.reutershealth.com/

          • Medscape Today

            http://www.medscape.com/Home/Topics/multispecialty/multispecialty.html


            An important article on asthma . . . effects from prenatal on! Now why can we not study the effects of fragrances in these and other cleaning and maintenance products, “environmental scents” such as candles, air “fresheners,” trashbags, and of course, personal care products. Don’t forget about flavors — the twin of fragrances! — barb

          • Are Household Chemicals Connected To The Rise In Asthma?

            23/12/2004

            “Frequent use of household cleaning products and other chemicals in the home could be
            linked to cases of asthma among Britain¼s children.

            “A new study of respiratory health among young children has shown a clear connection
            between breathing problems and their mothers¼ use of a range of common products
            such as bleach, paint stripper and carpet cleaners. …”

            http://www.alspac.bris.ac.uk/press/household_chemicals.shtml

            And on BBC :http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4115617.stm

          top of page




          Asbestos


          • Asbestos in the Home and Workplace

            September 1998 (updated March 2000)

            California Department of Health Services

            Indoor Air Quality Info Sheet

            Includes info on “Laboratories in California Accredited for Analysis of Asbestos…” — barb
            http://www.cal-iaq.org/asb00-03.htm

              To test our kitchen flooring for $35 in June 2004, we used:

              Asbestos ATM Lab

              1409 Fifth Street, Suite C

              Berkeley, CA 94710

              Contact: Mr. R. Mark Bailey

              Phone: 510-528-0108

              Fax: 510-528-0109




          • .Asbestos Information

            The Law Offices of Christopher E. Grell

            http://grell.lawoffice.com/articles17821.htm

          • The Asbestos Institute

            http://www.asbestos-institute.ca:80/main.html


          • ASBESTOSIS MORTALITY

            Tables and figures from the 1996 Work-related Lung Disease Surveillance Report

            http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/w7asbmrt.html

          • Human Exposure:The Key to Better Risk Assessment

            by Julie Wakefield

            Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 12, December 2000

            ” … In July 2000, [Vice President Al] Gore told the Children’s Environmental Health
            Network that he supported the establishment by 2004 of a national tracking system for
            asthma, cancer, and other diseases afflicting children that are potentially linked to
            environmental causes. The system would use the Internet to facilitate information

            collection by local public health agencies and health care providers, which would help
            focus efforts to address environmental health risks.



            “Such a network might have mitigated the tragedy in Libby. “Active tracking of
            environmental disease might have picked [the disease cases] up much sooner, and
            started preventive activities decades earlier,” says Campolucci. “We need an
            environmental surveillance system that evaluates human health.” Adds O’Hara,

            “All too often we haven’t had all the exposure information we need to make good
            policy.” But better coordination and expansion of human exposure assessment
            programs at the federal level and by industry should help fill the gaps, leading to
            better policies–and healthier people.

            http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/members/2000/108-12/focus.html

          • The White Lung Association

            P.O. Box 1483

            Baltimore, MD 21203-1483

            410-243-5864

            http://www.whitelung.org/


          ASH (Action on Smoking and Health)

          Pages in English | Deutsch | EspaÒol | FranÁais | Italiano | Portuguese

          http://ash.org/



          Professor Nicholas A. Ashford

          Also see Dr. Claudia Miller, EHN’s General Links, page M/Miller. — barb

          ASHRAE — the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers

          http://www.ashrae.org/


          Ask Annie (Annie Berthold-Bond)

          http://www.betterbasics.com/askannie/ask.html


        • Asparagus Fights Common Pesticide

          And barb thinks orgainc is best . . . so here is another reason to enjoy!

          Enzyme May Give the Veggie Pesticide-Fighting Powers

          By Miranda Hitti; WebMD Medical News

          Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD on Thursday, September 23, 2004

          “Sept. 23, 2004 — Looking to limit your exposure to pesticides? You may want to develop
          a taste for asparagus. The skinny green stalks appear to contain an enzyme that
          degrades a commonly used pesticide called malathion. …”

          http://my.webmd.com/content/Article/94/102865.htm

          Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners


        • Ask Annie




        • Ask the Workplace Doctors

          http://gwis.com/~wego/index.htm







        • Assaulted by fragrance

          California Health and Safety Code Section 41700

          41700. Except as otherwise provided in Section 41705, no person shall discharge from
          any source whatsoever such quantities of air contaminants or other material which cause
          injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to any considerable number of persons or
          to the public, or which endanger the comfort, repose, health, or safety of any such
          persons or the public, or which cause, or have a natural tendency to cause, injury or
          damage to business or property. …”


          “… 41705. (a) Section 41700 shall not apply to odors emanating from agricultural
          operations necessary for the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals.

          http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cacodes/hsc/41700-41712.html

          For Access and Accommodation — all for the want of Common Courtesy! — see EHN’s”Take Heart!”

          http://www.ehnca.org/ehnhompg/takheart.htm

          “Annette Green, [former] executive director of the Fragrance Foundation in New York,
          has said the restrictions are much ado about nothing, arguing perfume does not

          pollute the air and does not contain carcinogens, as cigarettes do.” [Emphasis added.]

          See:

          To better know these toxic chemical concoctions — perfume, cologne, aftershave, and other
          products for personal care, as well as cleaning and maintenance projects that carry the word
          “fragrance” — be sure to visit some of EHN’s other pages. Fragrances are advertized and sold as
          benign substances. Do your own research. Make your own determination. To begin, visit
          EHN’s FDA Citizens’ Petition, 99P-1340 and its analyses. The material is available for you

          to peruse on EHN’s site and on the site of Betty Bridges, RN — Fragranced Products Information
          Network. If you feel that these superfluous toxins do not belong in a school, a healthcare
          facility or any other workplace, please write to the FDA in support of 99P-1340. Also contact your
          representative and senators and ask them to support Safe Notification and Information for

          Fragrances Act (SNIFF), which must be re-introduced into the 108th Congress.

          SNIFF:ehnlinx/s.htm#SNIFF

          EHN’s home page: http://www.ehnca.org

          FPIN’s homepage: http://www.fpinva.org.

          EHN’s Take Heart / Law at ehnhompg/takheart.htm#Law


          It is my personal opinion that for a scented person to deliberately walk into an area of

          the fragrance-sensitized individual, to spray scented products near or in the work area of the

          fragrance-sensitized indiidual, and most definitely, spraying the fragrance-sensitized individual
          are all forms of assault. And that perfumed product could prove to be a deadly weapon. — barb


          To see where/how fragrance-free policies and programs have been implemented, visit:


          Assualts with fragrance chemicals . . . plus information showing the

          harmful fragrance chemicals and their effects

          Even though too many mainstream medical doctors aren’t educated enough to recognize and
          diagnose symptoms of chemical injury, and therefore seem as if they don’t believe us, our attackers
          do or they’d not be trying to harm us by using fragrance products as weapons. Obviously. — barb


          • Acute toxic effects of fragrance products.

            Author/s: Rosalind C. Anderson, Julius H. Anderson

            Issue: March-April, 1998

            http://www.zeal.com/exit.jhtml?cid=991790&wid=60362997&so=&xr=/website/profile.jhtml%3Fcid%3D991790%26wid%3D60362997

            Agression and fragrances

            Fragrance Exposure Causes Aggression Hyperactivity and Nerve Damage
            Neurotoxicology, Volume 1:221-237, 1979 brought to you by ChemTox

            Aggression or aggressive behavior, as a result of fragrance exposure, is often attached to the
            already chemically injured because we protest our being poisoned. Why is it that no one thinks in
            terms of AGGRESSION regarding those people using fragrance on their person or as a
            handheld weapon as a tool of assault. Why are they never viewed as having become AGGRESSIVE
            because of their chemical stews known beningly as “fragrance”? — barb

            http://www.chem-tox.com/pregnancy/perfume.htm


          • FDA Citizen’s Petition, replete with analyses and FDA contact information
            See for yourself the chemicals used to create several popular, modern scents. — barb

            FDApetition/bkgrinfo.htm

          • Fragrance assault, husband reportedly against wife

            And following is assault in the USA of a fragrant wife against husband. Regardless of where
            one is in this world — including healthcare facilities, schools, workplaces, places of worship —
            using or spraying perfume and other fragrance products could in effect become assault with
            a deadly weapon. People have died as a result of fragrance products. — barb

            Scotland’s Court Case:


          • Fragrance assault, wife reportedly against husband

            Above is the case of an assault in Scotland of a husband using fragrance products against his
            wife. Regardless of where one is in this world — including healthcare facilities, schools,

            workplaces, places of worship — using or spraying perfume and other fragrance products could
            in effect become assault with a deadly weapon. People have died as a result of fragrance
            products. — barb


          • Occupational acute anaphylactic reaction to assault by perfume spray in the face.

            by Lessenger JE.; PubMed

            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11314921&dopt=Abstract


          • Scent Sensitive Nurse Sues LDS

            By Michael Vigh; The Salt Lake Tribune

            “LDS Hospital nurse Susan Bell says she suffered for more than a year from daily headaches, eye irritation, swelling of her face and lips and other symptoms because

            her co-workers doused themselves in perfume or cologne. Bell, 57, says she became

            the office laughingstock for supervisors and colleagues, some of whom continued to

            bathe in their perfumes even after she told them it made her sick. She worked at the

            hospital for more than a decade before she took a disability leave in March 2001. …”

            I can personally assure you that Susan Bell is not alone! — barb

            http://www.sltrib.com/2002/oct/10152002/utah/7273.htm

          • Schools:

            Stories of Horror Faced by Students and Teachers

            For Access and Accommodation — all for the want of Common Courtesy! — see EHN’s”Take Heart!”

            http://www.ehnca.org/ehnhompg/takheart.htm


            • The Fragrant Door – A classroom door sprayed with perfume — Blistered!

              ehnhompg/doorjudy.htm

            • Halifax, Nova Scotia

              Includes articles of incidents of scented products causing adverse events in school.

              These are old stories, links might not work, but you’ve got the info to begin research. — barb
              ehnlinx/articles.htm#Halifax

            • Kids’ lack of respect threatens teachers

              http://www.jewishworldreview.com/dr/laura050200.asp

            • Pikeville County, Kentucky


              • Family wants perfume, deodorant banned from schools

                News-Journal wire services; Thursday, October 03, 2002

                and scrolling to the bottom of the page and its form. — barb

                ” PIKEVILLE, Ky. — Kristian Childers cries when she thinks about what she’s
                missing while holed up in her house.


                “The 16-year-old hasn’t been to school since she reported that a campus
                bully sprayed her in the face with perfume a year ago, causing a severe
                asthma attack that landed her in the hospital.


                “Childers said she is afraid to return to Shelby Valley High School until
                administrators ban perfume, cologne, and other smelly aerosol sprays

                that could be used as weapons against asthmatics. …”

                Write this newspaper by going to http://www.n-jcenter.com/opinion.htm#letters

                and scroll to bottom. — barb

                http://www.n-jcenter.com/2002/Oct/3/NOTE1.htm

              • Fragrant fracas: Lawyer asks that perfume be banned from schools

                MyInky;September 28, 2002

                ” PIKEVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Pike County school board has voted down a

                proposal to ban students from bringing cologne, body spray or perfume to

                schools in the eastern Kentucky district.


                “The policy was proposed in response to an incident last year in which a

                student at Shelby Valley High School was attacked with the smelly products,

                causing her to have a severe asthma attack. …”

                Write to: Paul McAuliffe, Editor mcauliffep@courierpress.com;

                J. Bruce Baumann, Managing Editor baumannb@courierpress.com — barb

                http://www.myinky.com/ecp/news/article/0,1626,ECP_734_1445132,00.html

              • Attorney: Proper steps not taken to protect asthmatic

                BY PETER W. ZUBATY, STAFF WRITER; Appalachian News-Express

                “A local attorney says the Pike County School Board failed to accommodate a
                student¼s disability when it voted down a proposed policy prohibiting possession

                of cologne, body spray, perfume or other aerosol products by students.

                “And that failure to act, said Elkhorn City attorney Tim Belcher, could potentially

                land the school board in a lawsuit to force the issue. The vote was 4-1 against, with
                Ravine Ratliff voting in favor of the policy.

                “The policy was proposed in response to an incident last year in which two Shelby Valley
                students allegedly attacked another student with such products, causing her to have
                an asthma attack. …”

                Write to: David Gross, Editor, E-mail: news@news-expressky.com or

                dgross@news-expressky.com — barb

                http://www.news-expressky.com/news-expressky/myarticles.asp?H=1&S=547&P=695283&PubID=11583

              • Our views ä on proposed perfume ban at schools

                Editorial by David Gross; Appalachian News-Express;Wednesday, October 2, 2002

                “Even in the face of threatened litigation, the Pike County Board of Education made
                the right decision recently when it rejected a proposal to prohibit students from
                possessing cologne, perfume and other aerosol products while at school.


                “While we sympathize with the asthmatic teen-age girl whose mother initiated the
                proposal, we also understand the majority of school board members¼ concern ã that
                such a policy likely would be unenforceable. …”

                Mr. Gross doesn’t say one word about the spraying. That’s an assault with a deadly weapon,
                not a prank! Email: dgross@news-expressky.com— barb

                http://www.news-expressky.com/news-expressky/myarticles.asp?H=1&S=547&P=697979&PubID=11623

              • Students Suspended for Endangering Fragrance Sensitive Teacher

                7th-Graders Raise Stink at School

                Seattle Times – Wednesday, March 22, 2000, 01:57 p.m. Pacific

                by Frank Vinluan; Seattle Times Snohomish County bureau

                http://members.aol.com/BoycottSBU2000/TeacherEndangered.html


              Now, for all those who want some hope, a middle school in Faribault, MN

              has banned fragrances, and there are fragrance-free accommodations working in

              Jefferson City, MO. More fragrance free accommodation information available

              on EHN’s Take Heart! — barb

              ehnhompg/takheart.htm


              • Decatur, Illinois

                Students breathing easier

                Spray products banned in some Decatur public schools

                myinky; By The Associated Press; January 14, 2003

                http://www.myinky.com/ecp/local_news/article/0,1626,ECP_745_1672242,00.html

              • “Faribault school bans students’ use of perfumes, colognes”

                http://www.startribune.com/stories/1556/1701620.html

              • Jefferson City, Missouri, Public Schools Section 504 Accommodation Plan

                “[A]n example of a progressive school that has implemented a comprehensive plan to

                provide a student with severe asthma triggered by perfumes a fragrance free
                educational environment including:

                   Fragrance Free school bus

                   Fragrance Free school

                   Fragrance Free Basketball team as well as all competing teams,

                coaches and officials – the team was 10-0 last season!

                   Fragrance Free extracurricular activities (dances) including

                chaperones and parent volunteers

                http://immune.best.vwh.net/stephanie/504.html

              • Stephanie’s (Jefferson City) Plan

                ehnlinx/s.htm#Stephanie’s


              — end of the section on Assault by fragrance. Let’s hope this crime of hate comes to a quick end! — barb




              Assistive Technology (AT)



            • The Association for Comprehensive NeuroTherapy (ACN)

              Latitudes

              Electrosensitivity: A Growing Global Concern

              Includes an article written by EHN’s Susan Molloy, with

              Arthur Firstenberg, founder and director of the Cellular Phone Taskforce

              http://www.latitudes.org/articles/electrical_sensitivity_articles.html

              The Association of Occupational & Environmental Clinics

              http://www.aoec.org/





              Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS)

              http://www.aapsonline.org/aaps/



              Assurances by fragrance industry that their products are safe
              or,

              Consumer Reassurance Charade – played by FDA and industry



                Chronological order:

              • Food and Drug Administration:

                July 1999 — after the FDA logged in and web-posted 166 public comments

                regarding Citizens’ Petition 99P-1340 — found buried at the bottom of a “food” page:

                “FDA has little or no information that would support actions to raise public

                awareness of possible health risks associated with the use of fragranced products. …”

                http://www.fda.gov/oc/fdama/fdamawebcast/stakeholdersquestions/foods.html

              • Some say a popular perfume is a health danger!!

                “… After contacting Calvin Klein for a response to the petition

                that the group filled with the FDA the company had this

                statement: ‘All of Calvin Klein’s products meet or exceed the

                requirement of the Federal Public Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act.’

                “Dr. Jacob Offenberger is an Allergist; ‘No manufacturer would like to

                sell any product that has real toxins in it or real irritants in it because it

                won’t sell.’ Dr. Jacob Offenberger is spokesperson for the Asthma

                Foundation of America. He says some people are just sensitive to

                perfume chemicals….and they are blowing this issue out of proportion. …”


                Write-up following EHN-Cancer Prevention Coalition press release,

                “Perfume: Cupid’s Arrow or Poison Dart?,” Feb. 7, 2000, immediately below

                Includes words of Judith Sanderson, Teacher, Culver City High — barb

                http://www.wsfa.com/Global/story.asp?s=58076

                  Another view:

                • Perfume: Cupid’s Arrow or Poison Dart?, Feb. 7, 2000

                  Released jointly by Dr. Samuel Epstein of Cancer Prevention Coalition and EHN.

                  PressReleases/fragfda3.htm

                Fragrance Materials Association

                They’ve removed their brag about defeating California labeling legislation in fall 2004, but they
                still proclaim that their products and ingredients are SAFE and WHOLESOME. — barb

                http://www.fmafragrance.org

              • Scented Products Education and Information Association of Canada (SPEIAC)
                Ad published following their press conference

                (http://www.ehnca.org/ehnlinx/aaprbb.htm) in

                Halifax, Nova Scotia, June 20, 2000

                “COMMON SENSE ABOUT SCENTS”

                http://www.scentedproducts.on.ca/hdnad.jpg

                In this ad, you are assured that:


                • All fragrance ingredients have been tested for safety.

                  The Research Institute for Fragrance Materials is an international
                  independent body dedicated to evaluating fragrance ingredient safety.

                • Fragrance ingredients are tested to the same standards that

                  apply to consumer goods like food.

                • The composition of perfumes hasn¼t changed much in hundreds

                  of years. They contain primarily water and alcohol — of the same

                  type and purity we drink in beverages — as well as essential fragrance oils.

                • Fragrance formulations do not contain toxic ingredients such as
                  carcinogens or neurotoxins.*
                • Perfumes and scented personal care products are regulated by

                  Health Canada.

                • The safety of an ingredient does not depend on whether it is

                  natural or synthetic. For example, almost half of the ingredients

                  no longer used in fragrances are naturals that caused skin irritation.

                    Another view:

                  • * Raw Materials of Perfumery

                    http://www.perfumersworld.com/chems/material.htm

                    Now let’s check another source other than the fragrance industry’s ads and public relations campaigns.

                  • Acetaldehyde Chemical Backgrounder

                    From the National Safety Council

                    Acetaldehyde is just one commonly used flavors and fragrance ingredient

                    “Health effects:

                    “Acetaldehyde is a substance which may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen,

                    according to the Seventh Annual Report on Carcinogens, National Toxicology Program,
                    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is also classified in EPA’s Toxic

                    Release Inventory (TRI) to be a known or suspected carcinogen. When ingested or
                    inhaled, acetaldehyde can irritate the eye, nose, and throat; cause conjunctivitis,
                    coughing, central nervous system depression, eye and skin burns, dermatitis, and
                    delayed pulmonary edema.
                    ” [Emphasis added.]

                    http://www.nsc.org/library/chemical/Acetalde.htm

                • ACETALDEHYDE — PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION — CAS NO. 75-07-0

                  “The main use of acetaldehyde is as an intermediate for the synthesis of other chemicals.
                  The main derivatives of Acetaldehyde are the oxygenated solvent Ethyl Acetate,
                  Pentaerythritol (used in the production of synthetic resins for the paint industry) and
                  Pyridines. Acetaldehyde is used in the production of perfumes, polyester resins,

                  and basic dyes. Acetaldehyde is also used as a solvent in the rubber, tanning, and paper
                  industries, as a fruit and fish preservative, as a flavoring agent, for hardening
                  gelatin, as a denaturant for alcohol and in fuel compositions.”
                  [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.chemicalland21.com/arokorhi/petrochemical/Acetaldehyde.htm

                • Acetaldehyde

                  CAS number . . . . . . . . . . . 75-07-0

                  NIOSH REL. . . . . . . . . . . . None established; NIOSH considers acetaldehyde

                  to be a potential occupational carcinogen as defined by the OSHA carcinogen
                  policy [29 CFR 1990].

                  From, NIOSH’s DOCUMENTATION FOR IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR
                  HEALTH CONCENTRATIONS (IDLHs)*

                  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/75070.html


              • Scents and sensitivities

                What to know before buying a Valentine¼s Day perfume

                By Francesca Lyman; Feb. 6, 2002; MSNBC CONTRIBUTOR

                “… Products are thoroughly tested before being marketed to assure their health

                and safety, says Glenn Roberts, spokesperson for the Research Institute for

                Fragrance Materials, an industry-sponsored group that does testing of chemicals. “


                ” … In response to the perceived problems of fragrances in the air, Roberts says

                that his industry group has begun the first study to examine fragrance inhalation.
                ‘We¼re spending a lot of money on this,’ he says, ‘to understand the systemic

                effects of fragrances on organs and nervous system, what happens when fragrances

                are inhaled.’ “

                http://www.msnbc.com/news/702445.asp

                  Another view:

                  Do take the time to read this excellent article. You’ll get info from both sides of the issue.

                  Notice the duplicity, as first we learn that the industry “thoroughly” tests its products and then
                  we discover that the industry has begun the first study [emphasis added] . . . And,
                  by all means, notice the dollars whine! The price to health the already fragrance-injured person
                  has paid in terms of health, jobs, homes, family . . . and the ultimate price, LIFE, is beyond
                  measure.


                  But let’s explore this concept of “testing” a little further. How can a fragrance product be

                  thoroughly tested if it is simply tested for the dermatological reactions to the primary user?

                  How can a product that is made to be smelled (inhaled) and not tested for its effects upon the

                  lungs, the brain, the reproductive systems of adult males and females, as well as developing babies,
                  be considered “thoroughly tested”? By what stretch of the FDA’s imagination are these

                  products so safe the public does not need to learn, “WARNING: The safety of this product

                  has not been determined.”? Why isn’t the FDA demanding its prescribed warning message

                  on the labels of all inadequately tested fragrances? And why, oh why, does the FDA claim that
                  it doesn’t have enough info to raise public awareness? It’s buried that at the bottom of a food page!

                  http://www.fda.gov/oc/fdama/fdamawebcast/stakeholdersquestions/foods.html

                  — barb





              • Phthalate Information Center – some of the info available July 10, 2002

                “Life Savers,” “Add Some Color,” “50 Years of Safety Studies”

                http://www.phthalates.org/


                • Groups Seek Ban on the Use Of Phthalates in Cosmetics

                  By JILL CARROLL

                  Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: July 10, 2002

                  “… The cosmetics industry said it believes phthalates in cosmetics pose no

                  problems. “There is no public-health concern [relating to] its use in

                  cosmetics,” said Gerald McEwen, vice president of science for the Cosmetic,

                  Toiletry and Fragrance Association. “We think they are safe as we are using

                  them in our products. …”

                  http://www.ewg.org/news/story.php?id=1076

                • Panel Reaffirms Phthalates In Cosmetics are “Safe for Use”

                  November 19, 2002

                  http://www.phthalates.org/mediacenter/pep_2002_11_19.html




                    Another view

                  • Acute asthma – acute tachycardia – anaphylactic reactions caused by

                    Fragrance & Perfume

                    ” In January of 1995 11 young Algerians deceased, following an attempt to get high on perfume of the international brand name ‘………….’ . They did not have a chance; only a few toxins are rapidly effective to such an extent, that death comes into effect within 48 hours, as seen in this case.

                    “According to a recent opinion of the Swiss professor and pediatrician Ottmar T–nz, breastfeeding mothers and women should boycott scented laundry-detergents. It ist known from general medicine, that todays common mixture of scents can be (partly) responsible for any symptom of illness …”

                    http://www.tox-doc.de/englisch/duft.htm

                  • Acute toxic effects of fragrance products

                    Archives of Environmental Health; March-April, 1998

                    Author/s: Rosalind C. Anderson

                    http://www.geocities.com/fragranceallergy/AcuteToxicEffectsOf.html

                  • [Access (US federal govrnment)]

                    “Board Adopts Policy to Promote Fragrance-Free Environments”

                    “… While many questions are yet to be answered, the Board believes in doing

                    what it can where it can. As a result, the Board has adopted a policy for its meetings
                    and public gatherings that will help reduce exposure to personal fragrances. Under
                    this policy, the Board requests that all participants refrain from wearing perfume,
                    cologne and other fragrances, and use unscented personal care products in order to
                    promote a fragrance-free environment. …”

                    http://www.access-board.gov/news/fragrance.htm

                  • American Lung Association® Offers Indoor Air Tips

                    for People With Allergies and Asthma

                    Fifth on ALA¼s list (I think this should be first!) — barb

                    “Stamp out strong odors or fumes. Perfume, room deodorizer, cleaning agents, paint and even talcum powder can trigger an allergic reaction. Refrain from using harsh-smelling products or keep them at low levels through adequate ventilation. “

                    http://www.lungusa.org/press/association/asnairt.html

                  • Following release of information, July 10, 2002, on phthalates found in fragrances by

                    NotTooPretty.org, the industry assures reporters who in turn assure the public that

                    fragrance products are safe; phthalates are safe. But, synthetic scents are not safe for me

                    at secondary and tertiary levels of exposure. . . and I am but one of tens of millions of people

                    adversely affected by these inadequately-tested-before-marketing mixtures of petrochemical
                    products. Remember, the FDA does not require pre-market testing of fragrances! And, the FDA
                    cannot issue recalls without first proving cause in a court of law, leaving recalls as a voluntary
                    action to be taken by the industry. See FDA Authority Over Cosmetics

                    http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-206.html


                    I wish our mainstream medical and government experts would stop using the word

                    “UNEXPLAINED” when queried about the skyrocketing rates of chronic illnesses and

                    premature deaths, and start seriously looking into the toxic chemicals that the public daily

                    applies to their bodies, the bodies of their children and elderly parents. These volatile toxic

                    which are released into the ambient air for all others to breathe, and also into the water to pollute

                    animals and fish, quite literally, downstream. Fragrances are a heady brew to release onto

                    an unsuspecting public without any FDA warning messages in place. — barb

                  • Earth Crash

                    Documenting the Collapse of a Dying Planet

                    Environmental Health: Male Infertility and Other Reproductive Problems in Men

                    “… The researchers note that exposure in the womb of laboratory animals to some
                    phthalates can cause effects very similar to TDS, and recent data show that human
                    exposures to phthalates are higher than expected. They argue for a re-examination of
                    phthalates’ human reproductive toxicity, for more data on exposure levels, and for
                    studies of the effects of exposure to combinations of chemicals.

                    WWF, the global environment campaign, is urging precautionary action now, because
                    it says testicular cancer and lowered sperm counts can occur decades after exposure.
                    It wants the European Union to agree to a precautionary presumption against the use
                    of endocrine disrupters until they are proven to be safe.

                    http://eces.org/ec/health/malereproductiveproblems.shtml

                  • Environmental Health Perspectives

                  • The Relationship Between Environmental Exposures to Phthalates and DNA

                    Damage in Human Sperm Using the Neutral Comet Assay

                    By Susan M. Duty, Narendra P. Singh, Manori J. Silva, Dana B. Barr, John W. Brock,

                    Louise Ryan, Robert F. Herrick, David C. Christiani, and Russ Hauser

                    http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/5756/abstract.html

                  • Reproducibility of Urinary Phthalate Metabolites in First Morning Urine Samples

                    By Jane A. Hoppin,1 John W. Brock,2 Barbara J. Davis,3 and Donna D. Baird1

                    http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2002/110p515-518hoppin/abstract.html

                  • Environmental Working Group


                  • SPERM DAMAGE LINKED TO PHTHALATE USED IN FRAGRANCES,

                    NEW STUDY BY HARVARD RESEARCHERS FINDS

                    “December 9, 2002: A new peer-reviewed study suggests that diethyl phthalate (DEP) ‚ a
                    chemical commonly used in fragrances and other grooming products ‚ is damaging
                    to the DNA of sperm in adult men at current levels of exposure. The study, posted
                    today on the Environmental Health Perspectives website, was conducted by Dr. Susan
                    Duty, a post-doctoral scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health; Russ Hauser, MD,
                    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health; and others.


                    “The study was conducted on adult males being evaluated in a fertility clinic, and found
                    a correlation between damage to the DNA in sperm and DEP exposure at the levels
                    already present in the men. DEP is widely used in many different kinds of products
                    containing fragrances. Recent product tests found the chemical in every fragrance tested
                    in the United States. …”

                    http://nottoopretty.org/pa_12_09_02.htm



                  Now how about a compare and contrast with Tobacco, which I state time and again will wind
                  up looking like small potatoes when the lid blows off the flavors and fragrance industry. — barb

                  Electric Words

                • APCO to Philip Morris — May 31 1994

                  European Sound Science Program

                  http://www.electric-words.com/junk/pmdocs/2025493120.html

                • Who Determines what is Junkscience? The Corporate Corruption of Science.

                  http://www.electric-words.com/junk/qandaindex.html

                  — end section on industry assurances and another view —




                Asthma

                I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: IF you want to turn the tide on soaring asthma rates, look to your personal exposures to commonly used personal care products and those used for household and janitorial cleaning and maintenance work. Any product that has the word “fragrance” on the label should be suspect IF you are serious about trying to control — and PREVENT — assthma. That benign sounding word hides a plethora of toxins that have not been fully subjstantiated for safety before being released to market. And worse, the FDA does not implement its requirement for the public alert: “WARNING: The safety of this product has not been determined.” See “FDA Authority Over Cosmetics” http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-206.html

                But Lance Wallace of the EPA has said to look to personal exposures better than I.

                  “A study by the EPA, covering six communities in various parts of the United States,
                  found indoor levels up to ten times higher than those outdoors — even in locations
                  with significant outdoor air pollution sources, such as petrochemical plants . . .”

                  http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/images/indoor_air_pollution.pdf

                and


                  “… The most comprehensive U.S. study to date has been the Total Exposure Assessment
                  Methodology (TEAM) study. This study was conducted in phases from 1980-1987
                  (e.g., Wallace et al., 1987, 1988). In addition, Phase I of the National Human Exposure
                  Assessment Survey (NHEXAS), conducted from 1995-1997 (Pellizzari et al., 1995, Sexton
                  et al., 1995) also examined this relationship. The major purpose of the TEAM study
                  was to measure the personal exposures to select chemicals in urban populations in
                  several U.S. cities. One phase of the TEAM study examined personal exposures of 600
                  people to a number of toxic or carcinogenic chemicals in the air and drinking water. One
                  central hypothesis of the TEAM study was that emissions from major industrial
                  sources in urban areas would be the primary source of the personal exposures to
                  volatile organic compounds of study participants who lived in these areas. In addition,
                  it was further surmised that these industrial sources would be the major source

                  of indoor air pollutant concentrations.

                  “However, one of the primary findings of the TEAM study was that for air toxics,
                  indoor sources were the primary contributor to indoor air concentrations and to
                  personal exposures for the majority of air toxics measured. …”


                Asthma info is scattered throughout this page. Use your find command from the top to get all
                items. Then, everytime you read about asthma, wonder just why our government agencies,
                charged with protecting public health do not even consider the role played by synthetic scents


                gratuitously added to a plethora of products used for personal care, as well as for household
                and janitorial cleaning and maintenance projects. Isn’t it about time for a change? There is a
                correlation between the increase dollar amounts earned by the fragrances industry and the
                escalating rates of various chronic diseases, including asthma and MCS.

                What can be done? Not much if you expect the government to do it for you. The industry fights
                health legislation, and their money talks.
                But, YOU can refuse to buy their products until they are
                released to market with substantiation of safety and better labeling information. YOU can force
                industry to change by “voting” with your pocketbook.

                A brief glimpse into my health history, should you care to know:

                I have a memory of my mother claiming there was a “mishap” at Shell Oil in Wood River, Illinois

                when my brother was an infant and I was about five. I’ve not found proof of that, but if anyone
                knows for sure that there was a problem at Wood River circa 1943, I’d like to know. Cousins who
                lived near that area are younger than I and don’t know and their parents are dead so they
                cannot be asked. If there was a release from Shell in 1943, it settled as a chemical pall over south
                St. Louis. Obviously, that refinery has had modern problems.

                What I have learned is that St. Louis had a severe “flu” outbreak at about that time. But I ask:
                Was that a true, viral flu, or a major flu-like reaction to the toxins that flowed down the
                Mississippi River Valley to butt up against the Ozarks, which start to rise just south of St. Louis?
                Until I learn more about the refinery in 1943, I’ll put my buck on it having been a chemical-
                induced flu, not viral.

                In any case, I remember my mother, infant brother and I being very sick with a severe bronchial
                cough — I don’t remember my father being affected, but then, he had a smoker’s hack and so
                he always had a strong cough. I do know he was not as ill as my mother. And for me, that
                marked the beginning of what later — around my forties — was finally diagnosed: Chemical-
                induced asthma. One can just imagine, with that as a background, how my body then reacted to perfumes that went from being made largely with plants and animal parts to being derived from petrochemicals . . . think HYDROCARBONS!

                As the flavors and fragrance industry is highly protected by trade secret laws, self regulation

                and fragmentation of what little government authority may exist, I suggest people start doing

                their own research. Notice if you come in contact with scented products: Do you find your throat
                becoming soar, you get a headache, your voice changes, you get the telltale signs of an asthma
                attack, or you go immediately into a dangerous, life-threatening asthmatic attack? IF any of
                those symptoms are one with your body, stop using scented products. FRAGRANCE-FREE
                alternatives do exist. And then, try to get your workplace to go fragrance free. Ask your store
                manager to carry more fragrance-free products. Do something! No one else can do it for you! — barb



                1992: I worked with Julia Kendall to put her “Twenty Most Common Chemicals
                Found in Thirty-One Fragrance Products”
                ehn20.htm

                and her “Fabric Softeners = Health Risks From Dryer Exhaust and Treated Fabrics”

                ehnfs.htm

                into one-page flyer format, which EHN distributes as two-sided copy at its tabling events. Julia

                then wrote, based on available asthma information , “Ten million Americans have asthma. Asthma
                and asthma deaths have increased over 30 percent in the past 10 years.”

                Would it were our various asthma and lung organizations, government agencies and healthcare
                professionals, et al., paid closer attention to Julia Kendall and the rest of us. Instead, we’ve
                been dismissed as hypochondriacs or psychosomatics, in favor of industry having carte blanch
                with its introduction of ever more inadequately tested chemical products for our daily use.

                So, it is up to you to guard your body and the bodies of your children. Be savy consumers. When
                reading about asthma triggers and you see words or phrases like “chemicals,” “chemicals in
                the air,” “irritants,” “strong odors,” etc., think FRAGRANCES. Thanks to the Internet, it
                doesn’t take much work to discover our modern fragrances are petrochemical derivatives made
                by man and are a very lucrative business for the chemical industry’s various facets. And, those
                same products can make you, your children — including those still in the womb — very sick.
                Remember the adage, An ounce of PREVENTION is worth a pound of cure.

                1998: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

                2004

              • Are Household Chemicals Connected To The Rise In Asthma?

                23/12/2004

                “Frequent use of household cleaning products and other chemicals in the home could be
                linked to cases of asthma among Britain¼s children.

                “A new study of respiratory health among young children has shown a clear connection
                between breathing problems and their mothers¼ use of a range of common products
                such as bleach, paint stripper and carpet cleaners. …”

                http://www.alspac.bris.ac.uk/press/household_chemicals.shtml

                And on BBC :http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4115617.stm

              • Occupational Exposures

                http://web.archive.org/web/20001022032337/www.ama-assn.org/special/asthma/treatmnt/guide/guidelin/comp2/occupati.htm

              • National prevalence of asthma and chemical hypersensitivity:

                an examination of potential overlap.

                Caress SM, Steinemann AC.

                State University of West Georgia, Carrollton, Georgia, USA. scaress@westga.edu

                OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the linkage between asthma
                and chemical hypersensitivity. METHODS: The authors conducted a population study
                with a random sample of 1057 geographically weighted cases to determine the
                prevalence of both asthma and chemical hypersensitivity in the American population
                and to explore their co-occurrence. RESULTS: A total of 14.1% of the respondents
                reported being diagnosed with asthma and 11.2% reported a hypersensitivity to
                chemicals. Of those with asthma, 27.2% also reported being hypersensitive to chemicals
                and 7.4% reported also being diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS).
                Of those diagnosed with MCS, 42% reported also being diagnosed with asthma.
                Additionally, 29.7% of those with asthma said air fresheners caused breathing difficulties,

                and 37.2% found scented products irritating. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate
                that there is significant overlap between some forms of asthma and chemical
                hypersensitivity.

                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15891531&query_hl=7&itool=pubmed_docsum

                Summary of Control Measures For Environmental Factors

                That Can Make Asthma Worse Figure 2.4

                JAMA lists perfumes at the very end of its info on Asthma, but at least it is
                there, under “Indoor / Outdoor Pollutants and Irritants.” JAMA states:
                “Other irritants
                (e.g., perfumes, cleaning agents, sprays). Now, let me tell you, when you read the word
                “irritant,” think POISON. If that definition is good enough for Oxford Dictionary, it should be
                good enough for our medical industry, our FDA, our EPA . . .

                http://web.archive.org/web/20000520083257/http://www.ama-assn.org/special/asthma/treatmnt/guide/guidelin/comp2/fig2-4.htm

                Reference is the undated Encyclopaedia of Occupational Health and Safety
                (third revised edition; their references were for work of 1973, 1974 and 1976).


                The text reads in part:

                  ” … The continuing use of perfumes and essences in food or for external application
                  should provide sufficient reason for systematic studies on the pharmacology and
                  chronic toxicity of all components to ensure that these substances do not contain
                  certain harmful or even carcinogenic constituents. The fact that most of the ethereal
                  oils have, for many centuries, been used as flavorurings, digestives, perfumes and
                  medicaments cannot be considered as guaranteeing their harmlessness; the unrestricted
                  use of these substances can be considered justified only following laboratory testing. “
                  [Emphasis added.]



                What caught my attention was the fact that the industry is always claiming that fragrances
                have been used since biblical times or have a long history of use or some such phrasing. Of course,
                they never give a hint that the fragrance formulas have changed one iota. Nor do they talk of
                the proliferation of the perfumes to pollute an ever greater array of products. And they top it
                off by telling us how safe the chemicals are as used and that their products and their ingredients

                are safe and wholesome. But, where, in all that is the truth? And where in that is the idea that
                “the unrestricted use of these substances can be considered justified only following laboratory
                testing.”?

                I’d certainly caution people to avoid fragrance products until we get that testing that was
                called for back in the late 1970s or early ’80s! — barb


                1999: The numbers of people now living with asthma are increasing dramatically — reportedly
                now a good 17.6 million people. The “experts” and “officials” remain stymied.

                October 2002: NOT listening to the already fragrance-sensitized individual has not led to a
                decrease in numbers of people with asthma . . . L@@K at that figure soar: over 24 million people

                have now been diagnosed with asthma sometime during their lifetime; 150 million worldwide.

                Perhaps mainstream medical doctors should start not only listening to their patients, but

                then reporting to the national resarch institutes and associations, their findings that synthetic
                fragrances in a myriad of personal care and cleaning/ maintenance products are causing, triggering

                and exacerbating asthma. Why not assume all asthma associated with fragrance products is a
                chemical “injury” and therefore should be reported to ICE (Injury Collaborative Activities)?

                http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/otheract/ice/ice.htm

                If you have adverse reactions to perfumes and other scented products, please visit EHN’s FDA
                Citizens’ Petition, 99P-1340
                replete with analyses of the chemicals and contact information.

                FDApetition/bkgrinfo.htm



                Keep in mind, that the seasons can bring on a heightened use of fragrances, which are derived
                from petrochemicals. These concoctions are crafted with tens to hundreds of inadequately
                tested chemicals and are used in combinations that have not been adequately tested for inhalation,
                nor systemic effects. Remember, the FDA does NOT regulate this industry. You must
                take their products on faith . . . while our doctors tell us the skyrocketing rates for asthma and
                other chronic diseases are UNEXPLAINED. — barb



                Asthma can be caused, triggered and

                exacerbated by modern

                petrochemically concocted fragrances!


                I’ve pulled just a few sites/topics up front for you, scroll slowly through this entire section,
                visiting the information available. If a link is broken, please inform. — barb

                American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI)

                http://www.aaaai.org/


                • Ask the expert

                  What irritants can trigger asthma?


                    Expert’s Response:

                    “Viral upper respiratory tract infections (common cold) are the most common cause of
                    severe exacerbations of asthma. Other irritants that have been shown to worsen asthma
                    with chronic exposure include aeroallergens and smoke. Triggers that may cause acute

                    bronchospasm requiring treatment with as needed albuterol include allergens, cold air,
                    air pollution, strong smells (excess perfume), exercise and certain food additives (sulfites).”

                • Helping a kid with asthma be a kid

                  All people who have family memberrs with asthma should buy products without “fragrance” on
                  the label. This is important in the home, at the doctors and hospitals, in schools, day cares, … barb

                  “Some of the asthma triggers your child may encounter at school include dust mites, chalk dust, animal dander, saliva and urine, strong odors (perfumes, paints, chemicals). You should make school personnel aware of your child¼s asthma triggers so they can help your child avoid them at school. Some suggestions for avoiding triggers at school include:


                  • Encourage teachers to use dry-erase boards or “dustless” chalk in their classrooms.

                  • Suggest that class pets not have fur or feathers such as a turtle, hermit crab, fish,

                    or snake.

                  • Ask staff to avoid using strong smelling soaps, deodorants, perfumes and

                    colognes.” [Emphasis added.]

                • Highlights of the 1999 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of

                  Allergy Asthma and Immmunology

                  Philip S. Norman, M.D.

                  “Asthma/rhinicis patients frequently complain of symptoms following exposure to
                  ftagrances. This study assessed respiratory symptoms in subjects who report sensitivity
                  to fragrance. A preliminary questionnaire was administered to 145 arergiclasthmafic
                  adults to assess asthma status, fragrance-induced symptoms, and identification of
                  fragrance brands which elicit symptoms. 125/145 (86%) individuals were asthmatic
                  (81% female and 19% male); 87% reported symptoms upon fragrance exposure. Upper
                  respiratory symptoms were the most frequently reported (81 %), followed by
                  shortness of breath with wheezing (77%), conjunctivitis (62%), eczema (30%), and hives
                  (22%). Fifty- eight percent indicated they were allergic to fragrance; the top eight
                  reported fragrances by asthmatics were White Diamonds, Red, Giorgio, Old Spice,
                  Charlie, Poison, Navy and Red Door. Fifteen asthmatics (14 females and I male) were
                  challenged in an inhalation chamber with White Diamonds (IOx – 50,000x odor threshold
                  atmosphere) for up to 120 minutes. The % change in FEV, at maximal fragrance
                  concentration ranged from +12.1 to -11.5. The mean decrease in FEV, (from baseline)
                  was 4.8%. No subject had a positive (20% or greater decline in FEVI) challenge. During
                  exposure, subjective symptoms were scored every 30 minutes (from none to severe)
                  by the subject; a two-step or greater increase from baseline was considered significant.
                  For the 7/15 subjects challenged at the 50,000 concentration, 5/7 (71.4%) subjects
                  reported a significant increase to one or more symptoms: odor (57.1%), nasal (28.6%),
                  ocular (42.9%), throat (42.9%), chest (42.9%), annoyance (71.4%), and overall acceptability
                  (42.9%).These results suggest that symptoms reported by asthmatics following
                  exposure to fragrances are more likely due to their effect on the upper airways.

                  http://www.hopkins-allergy.org/news/articles/1999/aaaai/aaaai99_abstract26-27.html

                • Asthmatics reaction to perfume

                  “SAN DIEGOãFragrances are often cited by asthmatics as initiating or exacerbating
                  asthma; and different fragrances vary in the number and intensity of allergic reactions
                  they cause, researchers said today at the AAAAI Annual Meeting. …”

                  http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2000/03/000304.html

                • Tips to Remember: Asthma Triggers and Management

                  – air pollutants such as tobacco smoke, wood smoke, chemicals in the air and ozone;

                  Chemicals in the air, THINK PERFUME and other FRAGRANCES!, but then they also list:

                  strong odors or sprays such as perfumes, household cleaners, cooking fumes (especially
                  from frying), paints or varnishes;

                  Let me assure one and all, it isn’t the “odor,” it IS the chemicals that volatilize! — barb

                  http://www.aaaai.org/patients/publicedmat/tips/asthmatriggersandmgmt.stm

                • Tips to Remember: Occupational Asthma

                  ” Occupational asthma is generally defined as a respiratory disorder directly related to
                  inhaling fumes, gases, dust or other potentially harmful substances while ‘on the job.’ …”

                  “… Prevalence

                  “Occupational asthma has become the most prevalent work-related lung disease in
                  developed countries. However, the exact proportion of newly diagnosed cases of
                  asthma in adults due to occupational exposure is unknown. Up to 15% of asthma

                  cases in the U.S. may have job-related factors. …”

                  http://www.aaaai.org/patients/publicedmat/tips/occupationalasthma.stm

                • Researchers explore ways to better manage asthma

                  Do you all know just how long it took the medical industry to recognize that coughing is also a
                  sign of asthma? YEARS! I’ve lived with chemical induced asthma since I was five. Never
                  learned about that until I was well into my 40s, because doctors didn’t think of that as a sign of
                  asthma. Did not knowing I had asthma keep me from the attacks? NO! If the chemicals got me —
                  including perfume — I’d have a severe coughing attack. My chest hurt, my lungs felt as though
                  they were being torn assunder. Often asthma led to a severe bronchitis, then it was COPD.
                  Doctors didn’t know that fragrances cause, trigger and exacerbate asthma and other diseases,
                  including airborne contact dermatitis. The EEOC said that asking folks to go fragrance-free was
                  unacceptable. I only got worse, until I left the toxic workplace and slowly, oh so slowly, I’m
                  getting better. It was the petrochemicals in the fragrances! And I did not wear or use perfume,

                  and totally eliminated all products that included the word “fragrance” on their labels. — barb

                  …Management of Chronic Cough in Adults

                  ” … [Physicians] should search for triggers of the cough, such as occupational

                  exposures or exposure to irritant gases or perfumes, and look for a

                  seasonal predisposition that may be suggestive of an allergic trigger. …”

                  http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2002/03/030502.html


                American Lung Association

                http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/

                Search ALA’s Asthma section for “perfume,” “fragrance ” and “scented.” — barb


                • Breathe Easy ® Office Features [from ALA Virginia]

                  “… Only fragrance free cleaning products are used. …”

                  http://www.lungusa.org/virginia/va_news.html


                  • What is a Breathe EasyÆ Office?

                    “Project tour brochures can be ordered by contacting the American Lung Association of

                    Virginia at (804) 267-1900 or by e-mail your request to program@lungva.org

                    “… Facility Policies – instituting a no smoking policy, a fragrance-free policy

                    and limiting the use of candles, air fresheners and fresh, high-polinating

                    flowers by employees. …”

                    http://www.lungusa.org/breatheasyoffice/office.html


                • Indoor Air Tips for People With Allergies and Asthma

                  ” … Stamp out strong odors or fumes. Perfume, room deodorizer, cleaning agents, paint and even talcum powder can trigger an allergic reaction. Refrain from using harsh-smelling products or keep them at low levels through adequate ventilation. “

                  http://www.lungusa.org/press/association/asnairt.html

                • How Friendly is the Air Quality in Your Child¼s School?

                  “…Asthma affects over five million children in the United States and is the number one
                  cause of school absences. Triggers are things that cause asthma attacks and vary from
                  person to person. Some common triggers are exposure to cigarette smoke; strong
                  odors such as paint, perfume, glue, scented candles, air fresheners, molds and mildews,
                  chalk dust and dust in old carpets or upholstered furniture. Many of these triggers
                  are commonplace in the classroom or school setting. “

                  http://www.lungusa.org/virginia/friendly.html

                • Taking Control of Asthma

                  “[C]ontrol asthma by understanding these triggers and limiting exposure to them.


                  • “…Household irritants, including dust, cleaning products, and perfume …”

                  http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/atipsheet.html

                Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

                http://www.aafa.org


                • Adult Onset of Asthma

                  “… At least 30 percent of adult asthma cases are triggered by allergies. People allergic to
                  cats may have an increased risk for developing adult onset asthma. Exposure to
                  cigarette smoke, mold, dust, feather bedding, perfume or other substances commonly
                  found in the person’s environment may trigger the first asthma symptoms.

                  Prolonged exposure to certain workplace materials may set off asthma symptoms in
                  adults. …” [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=326

                • Air Filters

                  “Gas phase filters. These remove odors and non-particulate pollution like cooking gas,
                  gasses given off by paint or building materials, and perfume. They cannot remove
                  allergenic particles.” [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=327

                • Allergies

                  You may find it interesting that while I was working in a highly scented office — and from which
                  I developed MCS — I could not be around my wonderful roses, wisteria, lavender, jasmine,
                  pinks, or other highly aromatic plants. But after having been out of the workplace for about four
                  years, I discovered I could again enjoy Mother Nature’s bounty. So there is hope, but clear your
                  life of “petrochemical-derived fragrances.” (Quote from DOI’s info on GREEN cleaning.– barb


                  ” … Often yes. Although substances such as soap powders, cigarette smoke, perfumes and odors from certain plants may irritate the respiratory tract of some people, especially people who are allergic, the symptoms they experience are not the direct result of an allergic reaction. In no way does this minimize the importance of reducing or avoiding these irritants.” [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=387

                • Asthma

                  I await the year when we don’t have the word “perfume” minimized by the word “even.”

                  Folks, demand proof that fragrances have been tested for inhalation and systemic effects. You’ll
                  not easily get it. I assure you. Without proof, you are giving up your health and life to faith in
                  an industry that is unregulated AND protected by trade secret status. – barb

                  “These irritants may include paint fumes, smog, aerosol sprays and even perfume. …”

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=338

                • Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)

                  But, how can one avoid fragrance products used by others? THAT is the cajillion dollar question.

                  But, I have an answer. Fragrance-free workplaces, schools, healthcare facilities, et al. — barb

                  “… Use cosmetics lightly and seldom. Avoid products with perfume and dyes, and
                  ingredients such as urea, lactic acid or other alphahydroxy acids. …”

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=394

                • Childhood Asthma

                  Folks, think in terms of PERFUME and other products with the word “fragrance” on the label as

                  not only a trigger, but the CAUSE OF ASTHMA. Let’s not shy away from this research! — barb

                  “… Other irritants in the environment can also bring on an asthma attack. These irritants
                  may include paint fumes, smog, aerosol sprays and even perfume.

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=342

                • Contact Dermatitis

                  But, folks, you don’t have to use perfumes and fragrance products to suffer a reaction to them. You can develop serious skin and respiratory problems from scents used by others. — barb

                  “… An allergic response on the skin may be the result of exposure to chemicals found

                  in many different products and plants, including:


                  • Dye for your hair, clothing, leather, furs

                  • Nail care products, cosmetics, sunscreen

                  • Fragrances, perfumes

                  • Rubber compounds

                  • Topical medications

                  • Poison ivy, other plants

                  • Detergents, cleaning products

                  • Metals, especially nickel

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=452

                • Holiday Allergies

                  And watch out for stores that bring in highly scented pine cones, blast scent through their
                  HVAC system, etc. And for those who can no longer safely take medicines, take your mask! — barb

                  “When visiting family or friends, be prepared for possible reactions to everything

                  , from pets to food to perfume. Never leave home without the appropriate

                  medication(s), equipment, and a written action plan so that the proper steps can be

                  taken in case of an emergency. {Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=410

                • Insect Sting Allergies

                  “The stinging insects love bright colors and sweet smells, so avoid wearing intense colors or perfumes when outdoors.” [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=417

                • What are Allergies?

                  But, what about the people who, through their personal choices of safer, greener, fragrance-free
                  products, try to avoid perfumes and other synthetically scented products, but are forced to
                  breathe the perfume polluted air from products chosen by others? Perfume lasts for hours, days,
                  weeks, months, years! Just save some of your fabric dryer sheets or scent strips in magazines
                  that by law are not supposed to leak. Go into a conference room hours after an odorovector has
                  poisoned it with her perfume. The fragrance industry says one should not exceed one’s “‘scent
                  circle of approximately an arm’s length” and yet crafts its synthetic scents to waft for
                  blocks (fabric softeners) and take away the breath of another who is at the opposite end of a
                  block-ong building. Until public entities go fragrance-free, we will continue to see skyrocketing
                  rates of UNEXPLAINED asthma, allergies and other chronic diseases. And those of you

                  who can still take drugs will be spending lots of money on them, too. — barb

                  “Are People with Allergies Sensitive to Other Substances in the Environment?

                  ” Often yes. Although substances such as soap powders, cigarette smoke, perfumes

                  and odors from certain plants may irritate the respiratory tract of some people,
                  especially people who are allergic, the symptoms they experience are not the direct
                  result of an allergic reaction. In no way does this minimize the importance of reducing
                  or avoiding these irritants.

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=26

                  What is Asthma?

                  Message above applies here too. — barb

                  “… Other factors contributing to the severity of asthma. Cold air, wind, rain, and sudden
                  changes in the weather can sometimes bring on an asthma episode. Medications like
                  aspirin can also be related to episodes in adults who are sensitive to aspirin. Irritants
                  in the environment can also bring on an asthma episode. These irritants may include
                  paint fumes, smog, aerosol sprays and even perfume. …”

                  http://www.aafa.org/templ/display.cfm?id=25


              • Asthma “crisis” for Black Americans

                Janice Hopkins Tanne / British Medical Journal 11aug01

                There isn’t a clue about triggers in this article, nor is there any word about the fragrance
                industry targeting African Americans for sales . .. but they do, along with Hispanics and children.
                What are the demographis of unexplained soaring asthma rates???? — barb

                http://www.mindfully.org/Air/Asthma-Crisis-Black-Americans.htm

              • CHILDHOOD ASTHMA: TOUCHED BY THE TRAUMA — Oct. 27, 1996

                ‘Her Asthma Is Just Like a Job . . . 24 Hours a Day, Seven Days a Week’

                “Rochelle Hasson has worn a constant path to the emergency room. …

                “… Her latest attack came when she smelled perfume at a movie theater. ‘I was breathing
                real hard and tried taking inhalers, but it didn’t work,’ Rochelle said. ‘So the ambulance

                had to come get me. They told me if my mother hadn’t called the ambulance and got me
                to the hospital, I would have died.’ …”

                Where it had been:

                http://www.latimes.com/HOME/NEWS/SCIENCE/REPORTS/ASTHMA/rochelle.htm

                ConsumerAffairs.com

                Perfume Hazards Health Concerns

                http://www.consumeraffairs.com/health/perfume_3.htm

                East Bay Express

                http://eastbayexpress.com/

                Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

                The EPA is finally getting it . . . Perfume POLLUTES! Look at EHN’s petition and learn
                what all is not known about the chemicals you apply to your body and the bodies of your

                children. Why wait for our government to tell you fragrances are harmful? The FDA still isn’t
                alerting the public and it has been years since they received EHN’s citizens’ petition with analyses

                and documentation. YOU can take care of your own health needs by purchasing products free of
                synthetic flavors and fragrances. Give it a try for a couple of months. See if you notice an

                improvement. Workplaces, including schools for all ages and healthcare facilities could also try a
                fragrance-free program for a couple of months. Keep a diary or log. See if you find health and
                productivity improved. If so, then develop a fragrance-free environment program and stick to it. — barb


                • Asthma in Schools

                  Perfumes, scented cleaning agents and air “fresheners” would be at the TOP of my list! — barb

                  “Each day, one in five Americans occupies a school building and the majority of these

                  occupants are children. Environmental asthma triggers commonly found in school
                  buildings are cockroaches and other pests, mold resulting from excess moisture in the
                  building, and dander from animals in the classroom. Secondhand smoke and dust mites
                  are other known environmental asthma triggers found in schools. In addition, some
                  literature suggests children with asthma may be affected by other pollutants found
                  in schools from such sources as un-vented stoves or heaters and common products
                  such as cleaning agents, perfumes, and sprays. [Emphasis added.]

                  Last updated on Friday, July 23rd, 2004

                  http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schools/asthma/asthma_in_schools.htm


                  • About Asthma Triggers

                    “… Irritants such as cold air, cigarette smoke, industrial chemicals, perfume, and paint
                    and gasoline fumes can trigger asthma. These irritants probably trigger asthma symptoms

                    by stimulating irritant receptors in the respiratory tract. These receptors, in turn, cause
                    the muscles surrounding the airway to constrict, resulting in an asthma attack. …”

                    Last updated on Monday, July 26th, 2004

                    http://www.epa.gov/iaq/asthma/introduction.html

                  • EPA’s FAQs . . . Shared air in apartment buildings . . .

                    “… What this means is that many activities (fragrant cooking, applying perfume or
                    cologne,
                    smoking, etc.) occurring in one apartment can be shared with other apartments
                    for many different reasons. …”

                    Last updated on Tuesday, July 13th, 2004

                    http://www.epa.gov/iaq/ets/frequent_questions.html

                  • I-BEAM Text Modules: Fundamentals of IAQ in Buildings

                    “This module provides the fundamentals to understanding indoor air quality. It provides a
                    rudimentary framework for understanding how indoor and outdoor sources of
                    pollution, heat and humidity, together with the ventilation and air conditioning systems
                    affect the indoor air quality in buildings. It also begins to address methods of
                    controlling those factors in order that the quality of the air which occupants experience
                    provides for their health, comfort and performance.”

                    Table 1.1 Indoor Pollutants and Potential Sources

                    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) . . .

                    “Paints, stains, varnishes, solvents, pesticides, adhesives, wood preservatives, waxes,

                    polishes, cleansers, lubricants, sealants, dyes, air fresheners, fuels, plastics, copy

                    machines, printers, tobacco products, perfumes, dry cleaned clothing.” [Emphasis added.]

                    Table 1.2 Indoor Sources and Tips for Mitigation

                    Occupant-Related Sources

                    personal products (e.g., perfume) [Emphasis added.]

                    http://www.epa.gov/iaq/largebldgs/i-beam_html/ch1-fund.htm


                • What human health effects are associated with indoor air pollution?

                  “Poor indoor air quality can cause short-term problems, including headaches, fatigue,
                  dizziness, nausea, and a scratchy throat. But its other effects include cancerãparticularly
                  from long-term exposures to high ETS and radon concentrationsãand aggravation
                  of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma. Exposure to naturally occurring radon
                  gas is the second leading cause (after smoking tobacco) of lung cancer among
                  Americans.39 The most sensitive and vulnerable population groupsãolder people, the
                  young, and the chronically illãtend to spend the most time indoors and may therefore
                  face higher-than-usual exposures.

                  You have to dig, but the EPA does list perfume as a VOC and it also lists VOCs as indoor air
                  pollutants. Perfumes also contain chemicals that are known carcinogens, hormone disrupters
                  neurotoxins and lung and skin irritants and sensitizers! So a note to the wise, do not use
                  perfumed products in a public venue … including your workplace, healthcare facility, school,

                  place of worship, opera, theater, restaurant, government agencies, . . . Perfumes pollute the air
                  for user and nonuser and adversely affect the health of untold numbers of people. — barb

                  http://www.epa.gov/indicators/roe/html/roeAirInd.htm

                  I’ve searched EPA from time to time over the years for word of perfume pollution. I admit

                  I do not do regular checks, certainly not daily, nor even monthly. But, I must say, I am so very
                  pleased to see that at least one government agency charged with protecting public health is starting

                  to let the public know that perfume pollutes. What we need is for the FDA to inform the public of
                  the various adverse health events that can be associated with the using of perfumed products
                  or breathing perfume used by others. Until such time, think of perfume as a timebomb in a
                  bottle . . . for you and those around you. There are safer alternatives. Be a wise shopper. — barb; 9/25/04


                FamilyPractice.com

                Occupational Acute Anaphylactic Reaction to Assault by Perfume Spray in the Face

                By James E. Lessenger, MD, From a private practice.

                “…. Conclusion

                “Sprayed perfumes can now be added to the long list of methods of occupational
                assault. The many organic compounds present in perfumes have been documented

                to cause or exacerbate asthma, eczema, or dermatitis. This case represents an incident
                of acute asthmatic symptoms in a person with pollen allergies when exposed to a large
                amount of perfume. …”

                http://www.familypractice.com/references/referencesframe.htm?main=/journal/2001/v14.n02/1402.07/art-1402.07.htm

                EHN’s FDA Petition — see the right hand column of the Analysis Summary

                Chemicals discovered with info from available MSDS, e.g.: “The chemical, physical, and
                toxicological properties have not been thoroughly investigated.” Also, you will notice

                all of the chemicals listed on the EPA’s Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory

                and on the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS). — barb

                http://www.ehnca.org/FDApetition/analysis.htm

                Environmental Protection Agency


                  Asthma Media Campaign

                  Sooooo, where is the information on avoiding products like perfume, cologne, aftershave, and

                  other personal care products as well as cleaning and maintencance products that have the word
                  “fragrance” on the label? “FRAGRANCE” sounds benign. Think petrochemical concoction. — barb

                  ” Childhood asthma is an epidemic in this country and many parents feel helpless to protect their children from attacks,’ said EPA Administrator Christie Whitman.”

                • Healthy School Environments – Asthma

                  “…common products such as cleaning agents, perfumes, and sprays.[Emphasis added.]

                  http://cfpub.epa.gov/schools/top_sub.cfm?t_id=41&s_id=25

                • Asthma Frequent Questions

                  “Irritants such as cold air, cigarette smoke, industrial chemicals, perfume, and

                  paint and gasoline fumes can trigger asthma. ” [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.epa.gov/iaq/asthma/introduction.html

                Find Articles

                Food and Drug Administration


                • Breathing Better: Action Plans Keep Asthma in Check

                  “…Common asthma triggers include dust, pollen, cockroaches, cold air,

                  smoke, and other strong odors, such as paint, cleaning fluids, perfume,

                  hair spray, and powder. …” [emphasis added]

                  http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2003/203_asthma.html

                Fragranced Products Information Network

                Can Fragrance Cause Asthma?

                By Betty Bridges, RN

                http://www.fpinva.org/Editorials/asthma.htm

                Health Care Without Harm’s The Issue

                Links out to more info on Cleaners & Disinfectants, Fragrances and Pesticides

                http://www.noharm.org/pesticidesCleaners/issue

                Research

                A long list of valuable links . . . well worth a visit! — barb

                http://www.geocities.com/fragranceallergy/Research.html

                Selected Abstracts on the Health Effects of Perfume

                http://www.herc.org/news/perfume/abstracts.htm


              • AANMA (Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics)

                http://www.aanma.org/

                About.com


              • Allergy and Environmental Health Association of Canada (AEHA)

                http://www.aeha.ca/


                • Help With…. – The Allergy and Environmental Health Association

                  Ottawa Branch; 11/8/01; Abstract:

                  This is it . . . but I’ve written asking if the document could be reinstated on AEHA’s site. — barb

                  “. . . these products are known to produce an addictive-type response that may cause
                  the user to experience a feeling of pleasure when the product is directly inhaled. Regular
                  users of fabric softeners (and perfumes) also often claim they “can hardly smell it”.
                  This too is an effect of chemical ingredients on neural receptors. The product is designed
                  to impregnate fibres and slowly re-release for an extended period of time. That

                  re-releasing affects the health not only of users, but those around them. The following
                  page contains a partial list of the chemical ingredients of fabric softeners and the potential
                  effects of exposure to them as quoted from manufacturers’ Material Safety Data
                  Sheets. For the purposes of this document, Central Nervous System has been
                  abbreviated to CNS. CNS toxin exposure symptoms include: dizziness, disorientation,
                  nausea, headaches, mood swings, numbness in face or extremities, pain in neck or
                  spine, memory loss, aphasia (difficulty speaking), confusion, irritability. CNS disorders
                  include: Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Dementia, Seizures, Multiple Sclerosis, Multiple
                  Chemical Sensitivity, Hyperactivity, Strokes, Attention Deficit Disorder, Sudden Infant
                  Death Syndrome. A good alternative to fabric softener or fabric softener sheets is a piece
                  of aluminum foil. Risks of Perfumes and Scented Products The chemicals listed on the
                  following page (along with Methylenechloride, Ethanol, Formaldehyde, and other
                  petrochemicals and neurotoxins) are among the 4,000 chemical ingredients used in the
                  manufacture of perfumes and scents. The Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.)
                  collected samples of every perfume sold in North America in 1993. Every sample
                  contained Toluene (a proven carcinogen and neurotoxin designated as Hazardous
                  Waste worldwide). Many also contain chemicals to mimic the pheronones (sex hormones)
                  of insects, musk ox, . . .”

                  http://www.aeha.ca//cgi-bin/../public_html/help-with.htm

                • Hospital Guidelines for Children with Sensitivities

                  By Dr. Lynn Marshall and Dr. John Molot

                  Canadian Society for Environmental Medicine and

                  Leslirae Rotor and Elizabeth Hare

                  Allergy and Environmental Health Association of Canada

                  “… We’ll get back to the kids in the hospitals. So, who tends to be hospitalized? There
                  are all kinds of horrible things that we see with kids in hospitals – trauma victims, cancer
                  victims and kids with bad kidneys and so on. But any of those kids could possibly
                  also have environmental sensitivities. The ones that would probably be more pertinent
                  to us are the kids who are admitted because they’re asthmatic. Lots of asthma.
                  Asthma’s on the increase. Fifteen per cent of the pediatric population has asthma.
                  Well, would you be satisfied if your child is admitted for asthma therapy because he’s
                  so sick and that the nurses are wearing perfume.
                  There’s something wrong with
                  that. Even the standard medical profession knows that for asthmatics chemicals with
                  odours: a) can cause a sensitivity reaction, or b) could be an irritant. Either way,
                  someone should put into place a policy so that the nurses can’t wear perfumes anymore.

                  And we should push for a little bit more than “What can I do for my kid?” As a group
                  we should be approaching the hospital organizations and so on and say logic dictates that
                  you should do something. The weight of the evidence is there – enough that why do
                  we have to wait for the perfect research to be there? We have to clean up the
                  environment.
                  …” [emphasis added]

                  http://www.schoolnet.ca/sne/e/nccs/hospital.htm

                • Practical Ways to Resolve Environmental and Allergy Problems

                  Caused by Housing, School Environments and Diet

                  Dr. Doris J. Rapp

                  “… Chemical sensitivities cause troubles in seconds to minutes. If a chemical bothers you,
                  you just walk by the person with perfume and suddenly you’ve got the headache

                  that’s going to last for two days. People won’t believe you, but it does happen. …”

                  http://www.schoolnet.ca/sne/e/nccs/rapp-01.htm


              • American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) Baltimore, Mar 1998

                Several Presentations on Innovative Approaches to Asthma

                Summaries by J.C. Waterhouse, Ph.D.

                (Based on information published in Syllabus rather than actual talks).

                Talks given by seven EI doctors. — barb

                http://hometown.aol.com/SynergyHN/6asthma.html

              • Asthma

                Dean Edell’s HealthCentral – Encyclopedia

                “… The stimulus or “triggers” that can induce an asthma attack are:

                … odors in the household, such as household cleaners, perfumes, paints, varnishes, fabric
                softeners, laundry detergents and cooking fumes

                Too bad Dr. Dean doesn’t also list perfumes and other fragrance products under his Workplace
                category. Modern synthetic scents have become ubiquitous and can cause or trigger more
                chronic diseases than only asthma. — barb

                http://www.healthcentral.com/library/librarycontent.cfm?id=244

              • Asthma in California

                “… The limited data that we do have on the occurrence, trends, and impacts of

                asthma in California tend to corroborate troublesome nationwide trends. More

                adult Californians, for example, are reporting that they have had asthma. In 1984,
                7.6% of adults reported through the statewide Behavioral Risk Factor Survey
                (California Department of Health Services) that they have had asthma at some

                point. This figure rose to 12.1% in 1996, a 60% increase. Based on a national estimate
                of asthma prevalence, 1.8 million Californians have asthma, including half a million
                children. As one of the most common chronic conditition in children, asthma is a
                leading cause of school absences and hospital admissions for children. …”

                http://www.dhs.ca.gov/deodc/ehib/ehib2/topics/asthma.html


                • ASTHMA IN CALIFORNIA: Laying the Foundation for a Statewide Strategy
                  Richard Kreutzer, Michael Lipsett, Julie Von Behren, and Eileen Yamada

                  “On May 29, 1998, in response to a growing public health concern about asthma,

                  more than 60 academic and clinical scholars, government agency heads, public health
                  practitioners, health foundation managers, voluntary health organization leaders, and
                  legislative staff met to discuss the state of knowledge about asthma and its implications
                  for research and public policy in California. …”

                  http://www.ucop.edu/cprc/asthma.html


              • ASTHMA MANIFESTO

                EFA is the European Federation of Allergy and Airways Deseases Patients’ Association

                ” Asthma: Addressing a Global Health Problem

                More than 150 million people worldwide live with the burden of asthma, with
                almost half experiencing symptoms that disrupt their everyday lives. In addition,

                prevalence is rapidly increasing on a global basis, particularly in children and young

                adults. Shockingly, asthma still claims 180,000 lives each year. This is an unacceptable

                situation, considering that much of this suffering is unnecessary and many asthma

                deaths are preventable…

                “In 1995 there were 42,333 asthma-related hospitalizations in California, 42% of which
                (17,860) were among children (newborns to 14-year-olds). The hospitalization rate for
                blacks, especially black children, remained very high. The majority of hospitalizations
                are thought to be preventable. Thus, the $350 million direct costs associated with these
                events are likely to be preventable as well. …”

                And does anyone bother to look at the role played by our modern synthetic scents? And just
                guess what peoples are targeted for sales by the fragrance industry . . . African Americans,
                Hispanics AND children! See EHN’s section on Statistics. — barb

                http://www.efanet.org/

              • 24.7 million Americans . . . — 5,000 asthma deaths annually (1999)

                U.S. Asthma Crisis Prompts Call for Americans to “Put Asthma to the Test”

                And as you read their stats on Asthma & Women, Asthma & African Americans, and
                Asthma & Hispanics, remember that women have used more fragrance products than men,
                and that both African American and Hispanic women are targeted — along with children! —

                by the fragrance industry. And when you think of fragrances, think of alcohol and when you

                think of alcohol think of all the studies that show that women don’t process that like men do. — barb

                http://www.lungusa.org/press/asthma/asthma_092602.html

              • AAIR – Asthma & Allergy Information and Research

                http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/index.htm


                • Allergy to Perfume in the Air

                  and similar illness due to perfume in the air we breathe

                  http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/perfume_corr.htm

                • Asthma: could it be caused by something at work?

                  Do not overlook the fragrance chemicals in an ordinary office setting! IF the fragrance
                  abusers can be noticed for any distance beyond their arm length — the industry’s standard
                  “Scent Circle” area — you’ve got yourself a case of perfume pollution. Perfume causes, exacerbates
                  and triggers asthma and a range of other diseases. Productivity drops when people feel sick. — barb

                  http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/asthma_occup.htm


              • aclaic.org: Strong Scent Induced Asthma

                This page contains several abstracts. — barb

                http://www.aclaic.org/revisiones21.htm

              • Asthma Fast Stats from CDC

                http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/asthma.htm

                  Asthma – Aim to be free

                  http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/airpollution/asthma/

                • Home Control of Asthma and Allergy

                  ASTHMA AND ALLERGY “TRIGGERS”

                  “If you or someone you know have allergic symptoms or asthma, you are sensitive to
                  “triggers,” including particles carried in the air. These “triggers” can set off a reaction in
                  your lungs and other parts of your body. Triggers can be found indoors or outdoors.
                  They can be simple things like:


                  • Cold air.
                  • Tobacco smoke and wood smoke.
                  • Perfume, paint, hair spray, or any strong odors or fumes.
                  • Allergens (particles that cause allergies) such as dust mites, pollen, molds,

                    pollution, and animal dander – tiny scales or particles that fall off hair,

                    feathers or skin – and saliva from any pets.

                  • Common cold, influenza, and other respiratory illnesses. …

                  Also under ALA. . . “Strong Odors or Fumes

                  “Perfume, room deodorizers, cleaning chemicals, paint, and talcum powder are

                  examples of triggers that must be avoided or kept to very low levels.

                  Right, Avoid fragrances that others use and wear to work, school, religious services, … How

                  does one avoid fragrances in fabric softeners that pollute your entire neighborhood? Avoid. Right!!! — barb

                  http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/asthomecon.html#triggers

                  Also underIndoor Air Tips for People With Allergies and Asthma

                  http://www.lungusa.org/press/association/asnairt.html

                • Asthma¼s Impact on Children And Adolescents

                  http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/airpollution/asthma/children.htm

              • AsthmaMoms

                “Unlike many other asthma information resources, AsthmaMoms has not received any
                money from asthma supply companies or drug companies. It prides itself in being
                an independent reliable asthma resource.

                Sincerely,

                Catherine McVay Hughes, Founder & President

                New York, NY

                http://www.asthmamoms.com/

              • Asthma Prevalence

                http://www.lungusa.org/data/asthma/asthmach_1.html#prevalence

                Asthma Rates Climbing Fast

                BANGKOK, Thailand, Feb. 17, 2004; CBSNEWS.com

                Again, the experts look at everything but fragrances. Fragrances are volatile organic compounds

                capable of causing, exacerbating and triggering asthma. Fragrances are released to market without

                substantiation of safety. Why don’t you look for safer, organic, petrochemical-free detergents and
                cleaners, and personal care products that are free of petrochemical-derived scent? — barb

                http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/02/17/health/printable600653.shtml


                • Fragrances CAN trigger asthma!

                  See EHN’s “Avoid Fragrances” (this page)

                  ehnlinx/a.htm#AVOID





                • About.com

                  http://www.about.com




                • Achieving Healthy Indoor Air

                  Report of the ATS Workshop: Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 16-19, 1995

                  THIS WORKSHOP REPORT WAS APPROVED BY THE ATS BOARD OF DIRECTORS,

                  MARCH 1997

                  Other Point Sources in Homes and Offices

                  ” . . . Control of pollution sources is incomplete if the odors from the occupants are not
                  minimized. Perfumes are among the most difficult to control since they are perceived
                  by their users as pleasurable. Personal rights and preferences for perfumed products
                  must be evaluated against the discomfort that scents cause for some people. The
                  odoriferous materials are highly volatile synthetic chemicals; in effect, they contribute
                  to the total VOCs. Scented personal products are not limited to perfumes; they include
                  residual scents on clothing from detergents and fabric softeners, soaps, shampoos,

                  deodorants, skin lotions, and cosmetics. The only successful method of control is to
                  eliminate these odors, either by avoiding their use, as with perfumes, or by using
                  unscented products. …

                  Two-bits’ worth by barb: Let me assure everyone, it is not mere “discomfort that scents
                  cause for some people,” although, they too, should not have to be forced to inhale another person’s
                  choice of odor. But for the already chemically injured — POISONED — it can be a life and death
                  situation. Now, how can any employer, school administrator, healthcare administrator and

                  professional or executive of government entities grant the right to odorovect toxic chemicals
                  from personal care products over another’s right to breathe? I ask you. The goal should be

                  cleaner air for all; not the pleasure of wearing or using toxic synthetic fragrance products for some.

                  http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/3/S33

                • Acute asthma – acute tachycardia – anaphylactic reactions caused by Fragrance & Perfume

                  “In January of 1995 11 young Algerians deceased, following an attempt to get high on

                  perfume of the international brand name “………….” . They did not have a chance; only a
                  few toxins are rapidly effective to such an extent, that death comes into effect within
                  48 hours, as seen in this case.”

                  http://www.tox-doc.de/englisch/duft.htm


                • The Adverse Effect of Low Levels of Ambient Air Pollutants on Lung Function

                  Growth in Preadolescent Children

                  http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/1999/107p669-674jedrychowski/abstract.html


                • Asthma – A National Emergency

                  ” Common indoor pollutants such as molds, animal and insect allergens, and chemicals trigger asthma.

                  AeriasTM

                  “…Minimizing Chemical Pollutants and Odors

                  Volatile chemicals and odors can be minimized through removal of the source and/or
                  use of low-emitting/low-odor furnishings, materials, and processes. Many
                  commercial and public facilities are endorsing smoke free, fragrance-free environments. …”

                  http://www.aerias.org/cgi-bin/news-shell.asp?article=159

                • Airway allergy and worklife.

                  Malmberg P

                  Scand J Work Environ Health 2001;27(6):422-425.

                  They state, “strong scents.” — barb

                  http://www.occuphealth.fi/cgi-bin/sjweh/abst_testi.pl?key=2001|6|422–|1

                • AllAllergies

                  http://allallergy.net/allallergy/index.html


                • Allergies … Dr. Rapp


                • Allergy Asthma Technology,

                  Call 1- 800-621-5545 — ask for free Allergy & Asthma Guide

                  8224 Lehigh Avenue

                  Morton Grove, IL 60053

                  http://www.allergyasthmatech.com/


                • American Academy of Environmental Medicine

                  http://www.healthy.net/pan/pa/NaturalTherapies/aaem/index.html




                • American Lung Association (ALA)

                  http://www.lungusa.org/


                  • Home Control Of Allergies And Asthma

                    http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/asthomecon.html

                  • American Lung Association® Offers Indoor Air Tips

                    for People With Allergies and Asthma

                    Fifth on ALA¼s list (I think this should be first!) — barb

                    “Stamp out strong odors or fumes. Perfume, room deodorizer, cleaning agents, paint and even talcum powder can trigger an allergic reaction. Refrain from using harsh-smelling products or keep them at low levels through adequate ventilation. “

                    http://www.lungusa.org/press/association/asnairt.html


                • American Medical Association (AMA)

                  “Discuss ways to reduce exposures to the following: Other irritants (e.g., perfumes,

                  cleaning agents, sprays)” [emphasis, mine].

                  http://www.ama-assn.org/



                    “Figure 2-4. Summary of Control Measures for Environmental Factors That Can

                    Make Asthma Worse … Indoor/Outdoor Pollutants and Irritants

                    Discuss ways to reduce exposures to the following: Wood-burning stoves or fireplaces; Unvented stoves
                    or heaters; Other irritants (e.g., perfumes, cleaning agents, sprays).” – barb wilkie 3/29/98

                    http://.ama-assn.org/special/asthma/treatment/guide/guidelin/comp2/fig2-4.htm


                • Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

                  Search for the word “Perfume” Well that was the old days, when they had a site you could
                  read and find your way around. Now, it looks good, but links I had no longer work and I can’t
                  read a thing on their site to even begin trying to find curcial information now. (4/02) — barb

                  http://www.aafa.org/


                  • Answers to FAQs

                    “Have you had coughing, wheezing, or shortness of breath in certain places or when exposed to

                    certain things (e.g. animals, tobacco smoke, perfumes)? “

                    http://www.aafa.org/whatis.html



                  The Association between Asthma and Allergic Symptoms in Children

                  and Phthalates in House Dust: A Nested Case-Control Study

                  Carl-Gustaf Bornehag, et.al.

                  Environmental Health Perspectives; Volume 112, Number 14; October 2004

                  Phthalates are commonly used in fragrance manufacture to make the fragrance last. I had only
                  sporadic bouts of short-lived, chemical-induced asthma attacks until the proliferation of
                  perfumed products in my former workplace. It was then that my asthma was first diagnosed as I
                  coughed, never wheezed, and the attacks became more severe and lengthened. I progressed to
                  chronic bronchitis. Out of that toxic workplace for six years and I again have fewer asthma
                  episodes, but perfumes are still a terrible trigger. — barb

                  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/members/2004/7187/7187.html

                • Asthma drug – INHALED STEROID USE LINKED TO CATARACTS

                  Optimal Wellness Center

                  “The prolonged use of high doses of inhalant corticosteroids, frequently prescribed to

                  relieve symptoms of asthma, may increase the risk of cataract formation in older people.

                  http://www.mercola.com/1998/aug/16/index.htm

                • Asthma and Allergy Relief Experts

                  Interestingly, I have not been able to find any info on avoiding synthetic fragrances on

                  this site. It seems to mainly tout drugs. Also, Dr. Offenberger was quoted as saying

                  . . . well, read it for yourself, below, under WFSA – Montgomery, Alabama. — barb

                  http://www.asthmadoc.com/


                  • Dr. Jacob Offenberger

                    “The worst disease in the world is ignorance. Anything that can

                    alleviate ignorance will contribute to the wellness of society.”

                    -Jacob Offenberger, MD-

                    http://www.asthmadoc.com/about.html



                    • WFSA – Montgomery, Alabama

                      Some say a popular perfume is a health danger!!

                      http://www.wsfa.com/Global/story.asp?s=58076

                      This seemingly is a write-up of the KNBC-TV Los Angeles Valentine’s Day 2000

                      11 p.m. news coverage. Dr. Jacob Offenberger is given as spokesperson for the

                      Asthma Foundation of America. Note Dr. Offenberger’s comments:

                      “No manufacturer would like to sell any product that has real toxins in it or real irritants
                      in it because it won’t sell.”
                      … and —

                      “[S]ome people are just sensitive to perfume chemicals….and they are blowing this
                      issue out of proportion
                      .”

                      I don’t know about YOU, but it seems to me Dr. O proves his comment: “The worst disease in
                      the world is ignorance.” I’ve written to him and have been ignored. So much for his wish to
                      alleviate ignorance and contribute to the wellness of society! — barb






              • Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, Florida Chapter Inc.

                http://www.aafaflorida.org/

              • Asthma and Allergy Information and Research (AAIR)

                http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/index.htm



                • Asthma: could it be caused by something at work?

                  Do not overlook the fragrance chemicals in an ordinary office setting! IF the fragrance
                  abusers can be noticed for any distance beyond their arm length — the industry’s standard
                  “Scent Circle” area — you’ve got yourself a case of perfume pollution. Perfume causes, exacerbates
                  and triggers asthma and a range of other diseases. Productivity drops when people feel sick. — barb

                  http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/asthma_occup.htm


              • Asthma and Allergy Statistics

                National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

                National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, MD 20892

                ” In 1994, the estimated number of people with self-reported asthma in the

                United States was 14.6 million. The estimate for 1998 has risen to 17 million.”

                Note: Y2K, ALA states more than 17 million people have asthma. — barb

                http://www.niaid.nih.gov/factsheets/allergystat.htm


              • Asthma Center, The

                http://www.asthma-center.com/facts.html


              • Asthma Education Network

                “Dr. Shapiro: ‘True. We hear frequently about mold problems in heating systems, old

                carpeting, cleaning agents and co-workers’ perfumes that are irritants.

                [Emphasis added.] Certainly the workplace can be a problem.

                http://www.htinet.com/aen/toc/Triggers/01.html

              • Asthma Education & Resource Council

                5 Bon Air Road, Suite 110 Larkspur, California

                (415) 924-3647 FAX (415)927-7387

                email: asthma@marin.org

                http://home.earthlink.net/~claudiarn/asthma/index.html

              • Asthma and the Environment — PDF file, 1 mb

                http://www.epa.gov/children/fin.pdf


              • Asthma in America – Background

                “What causes asthma symptoms and attacks?

                “… Irritants in the air, including smoke from tobacco, wood fires or charcoal grills,
                as well as strong fumes or odors like household sprays, paint, gasoline, perfume and
                scented soaps
                . [Emphasis added.]

                http://www.asthmainamerica.com/bkgrd.htm

              • Asthma is highest in cultures targeted by fragrance industry

                Why don’t our government agencies and major health organizations explore this connection?
                In the meantime, any person in any household can simply try to eliminate the use of
                synthetic fragrances from his/her daily life. Of course, one is always subjected to the

                outgassin (volatilizing) of synthetic scents used by others. And therein lies the fact that

                to wear fragrances and to use fragrance in a pupblic venue, means it is a public health

                issue, not a personal choice. — barb



                • African-American Women

                  Business & Industry Database

                  “Study finds African-American women as a group are more than twice as likely as

                  women of other races to buy fragrances Original Title: Ethnic Fragrance Market

                  Source: Chemical Marketing Reporter, VOL:251, ISS:22, PG:25, June 02, 1997.
                  ISSN: 0090-0907
                  http://chemweb.com/

                • Hispanic Women

                  “Business & Industry Database

                  “Survey finds US Hispanic women spend 43% more on fragrance products and 27% more
                  on makeup than the average American woman Original Title: COSMETICS MAKERS
                  TARGETING HISPANIC MARKET Source: Miami Herald (FL), PG:N/A, March 03, 1997.
                  ISSN: 0898-865X Document Type: Regional NewspaperPublication Country:
                  United States Language: EnglishRecord Type: Fulltext, Abstract Word Count: 849

                  http://chemweb.com/



                12/2/00 — Now there’s proof positive that our children are being targeted by the fragrance
                industry. See Fragrance Foundation’s Events for 2000-2001. Scroll down to
                March 2001.


                This site is set up in frames. It is likely to beam up on, “Holiday ’99: Malicious Lies &
                Tantalizing Truths – The Fragrance Foundation and the New York Times invite you
                to the first meeting of the New Millennium,
                ” so click on “Back to Events” and then
                click on “Fragrance
                Foundation’s Events for 2000-2001.” By the way, if you ever have
                wondered why the truth about the toxicity of fragrances is not readily available through the
                media, this should give you a clue. NY Times! Malicious Lies — what the
                advertising? The REAL truth is far from tantalizing. For the REAL TRUTH, visit the Citizens’
                Petition currently before the US FDA at FDApetition/bkgrinfo.htm — barb



                  THINK TANK #5 ‚ „CHILDREN¼S SCENTS: A NEW PROFIT CENTER¾

                  Wednesday, March 14

                  8:30 a.m. Breakfast Buffet

                  9:00 a.m. Presentation

                  Conference Centre at The Fragrance Foundation

                http://www.fragrance.org/cgi/fetch_outer_events.cgi?thing=1831359

              • ASTHMA IS INCREASING AMONG U.S. CHILDREN

                (RACHEL’S HAZARDOUS WASTE NEWS #218)



              • Asthma LA TIMES (also see Newspapers, N. Some newspapers archive thier articles, but you’ll at least have the name.)
                Childhood Asthma: Touched by the Trauma — ‘Her Asthma Is Just Like a Job . . .

                24 Hours a Day, Seven Days a Week’


              • Asthma and Perfumes – Research related to the asthma and perfumes

                By Betty Bridges, RN

                http://www.ameliaww.com/fpin/Asthma%20&%20Perfumes.htm

              • Asthma & Physical Activity in the School

                Making a Difference

                National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: National Institutes of Health

                “- Strong smells and chemical sprays, including perfumes, paint and cleaning solutions,
                chalk dust, lawn and turf treatments”

                “… Irritants


                  – Cold air

                  – Strong smells and chemical sprays, including

                  perfumes, paint and cleaning solutions, chalk

                  dust, lawn and turf treatments

                  – Weather changes

                  – Cigarette and other tobacco smoke

                http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/lung/asthma/phy_asth.txt


              • Asthma Resources (from Children’s Environmental Health Network)



              • Asthma Society of Canada

                http://www.asthma.ca/



              • ASTHMA Statistics

                See EHN’s General Links, page S, Statistics

                ehnlinx/s.htm#Statistics

              • AsthmaMoms

                Alas, this site links out to asthma info that does not contain one hint about the toxic

                chemicals found in synthetic fragrances, which are known irritants and sensitizers.

                Hello, asthma rate increase! — barb

                http://www.asthmamoms.com/

              • Breathing Room – The battle over new ozone restrictions pits asthma sufferers

                against skeptical industry leaders; by Glynn Wilson; Metro Pulse

                http://metropulse.com/dir_zine/cover_dir/711_air.html


              • BRONCHIAL ASTHMA – – WHO (World Health Organization)

                “The Scale of the Problem: Between 100 and 150 million people around the

                globe — roughly the equivalent of the population of the Russian Federation —

                suffer from asthma and this number is rising. World-wide, deaths from this

                condition have reached over 180,000 annually. …”

                http://www.who.int/inf-fs/en/fact206.html


              • California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) and
                Air Resources Board


                  Children’s Health

                • Children¼s Activity Patterns and Inhalation Rates:

                  Determinants of Exposure and Dose

                  By Susan B. Lum, Peggy Jenkins, Dorothy Shimer

                  Research Division, California Air Resources Board

                  “… ARB¼s breathing study documented that children inhale more air than do
                  adults, relative to body surface area, during similar activities. It provided the
                  first measurements of the actual amount of air breathed for a sample of
                  children of different ages and backgrounds. …”

                  http://www.oehha.org/public_info/public/kids/pdf/Activit1.pdf

                • F.A.C.E.S. (Fresno Asthmatic Children’s Environment Study)

                  http://www.oehha.org/public_info/public/kids/index.html


              • Carpet Cleaning


                • Modeling of Exposure to Carpet-Cleaning Chemicals

                  Preceding Irritant-Induced Asthma in One Patient

                  Richard M. Lynch; Department of Urban Studies and Community Health, Rutgers University,

                  New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA

                  Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 9, September 2000

                  http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2000/108p911-913lynch/abstract.html

              • Cat Asthma

                NEW TREATMENTS BEING CONSIDERED FOR FELINE ASTHMA

                Media Relations & Marketing

                Source: Lisa Moore, 785-532-5690; e-mail: lmoore@vet.ksu.edu
                .

                News release prepared by: Mark Berry, 785-532-6415 – Friday, May 10, 2002

                “… Cats with asthma are often sensitive to cigarette smoke, perfume, aerosols, dusty cat litter and powdered carpet deodorizers …”

                Instead of loading poor kitty up with drugs, why not switch to fragrance-free, eco-friendly
                products and save your own health and the health of your children as well? — barb

                http://www.mediarelations.ksu.edu/WEB/News/NewsReleases/listasthma51002.html

              • Childhood Asthma Taskforce

                http://www.flint.lib.mi.us/catf/Asthmainfo.html


              • Children’s Health Protection

                  First Lady Announces Major Asthma Initiative

                  On January 28, 1999, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton [1MB PDF file] announced a

                  joint EPA and DHHS initiative to fight childhood asthma through a comprehensive

                  national strategy that includes new efforts to

                  1) implement school-based programs to teach children how to effectively manage their asthma;

                  2) invest in research to determine the environmental causes of asthma and to develop
                  new strategies to reduce children’s exposure to asthma triggers;

                  3) provide funds to states and providers to help them implement effective disease
                  management strategies to lower hospitalizations, emergency room visits and deaths
                  from asthma; and

                  4) conduct a new public information campaign to reduce exposure to asthma triggers.

                http://www.epa.gov/children/asthma.htm



              • Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures

                Committee on the Assessment of Asthma and Indoor Air, Division of Health

                Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine

                National Academies Press

                456 pages, 6 x 9, 2000; ISBN: 0-309-06496-1

                To read or search online . . . pages 247 – 250 and 400-401 deal with fragrances

                http://www.nap.edu/books/0309064961/html/

                Start page 247:

                http://books.nap.edu/books/0309064961/html/247.html#pagetop

                Start page 400:

                http://books.nap.edu/books/0309064961/html/400.html#pagetop


              • Clear Breathing

                http://www.clearbreathing.com/


                • The Costs and Consequences of Asthma

                  http://www.clearbreathing.com/disease/asthma_cost.asp

                • What is Asthma?

                  Note: Listed under What Can Trigger Asthma? is:

                  Strong odors and sprays: Surprising to some people is that perfume sprays can

                  cause asthma symptoms, so too can household cleaners and fumes from cooking.

                  True, perfume does trigger asthma, but that information is somewhat misleading in that they
                  state perfume SPRAYS. Let me assure you, fragrances are made to quickly volatilize. They do
                  not need to be sprayed to cause asthma. Perfumes and other “fragrances” in personal care
                  products, including cosmetics and pharmaceutical, as well as household and janitorial cleaning
                  and maintenance products, quickly leave the user to pollute the air for all. — barb

                  http://www.clearbreathing.com/disease/asthma_whatis.asp#triggers


              • Dept. of Energy / Environment Safety and Health Information Portal

                RECORD ID D97-01-009

                STANDARD NUMBER

                INFORMATION DATE 01-16-1997

                SUBJECT Recordability Of Asthma Attack

                Due To Perfume At Work

                QUESTION

                Is this case recordable? We have an employee who has asthma. This employee has had
                asthma episodes resulting in work absences which her physician says were
                aggravated by exposure to irritants such as smoke and perfumes. Although our
                workplace is smoke-free, some employees wear perfumes and it is believed that these
                perfumes may have aggravated the asthma condition. Are perfumes worn by co-workers
                considered a workplace hazard?

                REGULATORY REVIEW

                Yes. An occupational illness is recordable when workplace conditions contribute to or
                aggravate a medical condition, even if the condition is a pre-existing condition. In general,
                each work-related asthmatic episode is recordable as a new case since it is triggered
                by a new exposure. The concept of employer fault does not affect the recordability.
                As stated in C-12 on page 35 of the “Recordkeeping Guidelines for Occupational
                Injuries and Illnesses” (the “Blue Book”), “Sections 8(c)(2)and 24(a) of the OSH Act
                specifically define recordable injuries and illnesses. They make no distinction between
                incidents that are compensable under State workers’ compensation laws, incidents that
                are caused by worker negligence, incidents caused by employer neglect, incidents
                that are preventable, or the random incidents that seem to happen when no one is at
                fault.” The hazard status of perfume does not affect the requirement to record an
                occupational illness triggered by exposure to it in the workplace. In discussing
                recordable occupational illnesses, the “Blue Book” uses the terms “environmental
                factors”, “suspected agents”, and “other conditions”, without assigning a recognition

                of hazard to them.

                http://tis.eh.doe.gov/rl/pres/docs/D9701009.HTM

              • EFA – European Federation of Asthma and Allergy Associations

                EFA is the European Federation of Asthma and Allergy Associations, an alliance of

                33 organisations in 17 different countries across Europe.

                http://www.efanet.org/


                • Newsletters

                  PDF files. But, if you download Issue 3 1999, you’ll read:

                  “The main worry of parents (38%) concerns the impact of the outside home

                  environment (e.g. tobacco smoke, perfumes, dust and animal dander)

                  and being in a situation of not knowing what to do in case of an asthma attack (34%). …”
                  http://www.efanet.org/newsletters/Default.htm

                http://dci.nhlbi.nih.gov/Diseases/Asthma/Asthma_Causes.html

              • e-Medicine Consumer Health

                Asthma FAQs

                What causes asthma?

                Triggers are different for different individuals. Common ones include the following:

                    Exposure to tobacco smoke

                     Breathing polluted air

                    Inhaling irritants such as perfume and cleaning products …

                http://www.emedicinehealth.com/articles/43626-2.asp

              • EPA states in Asthma Management in Your School

                Poor Indoor Air — the Asthma Connection

                “Bronchial irritants also found:


                • chemicals, cleaners, dust, fragrances, fumes, food odors, etc.”

                I hate to be the one breaking the news to the EPA, but fragrances themselves are chemicals! — barb

                A PDF file

                http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schools/symposium/asthma_management_in_your_schools.pdf

              • F.A.C.E.S. (Fresno Asthmatic Children’s Environment Study)

                http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/faces/faces.htm


                • F.A.C.E.S. (Fresno Asthmatic Children’s Environment Study)

                  Enrollment Offer Page

                  “If your child:


                  • is between 6 and 11 years of age
                  • has been told by a doctor he/she has asthma
                  • lives in the Fresno/Clovis area

                  they may be eligible for this study.

                  “To see if your child is eligible or to find out more about participation in this study, please call: Kathy Butler at the FACES Fresno office (559) 294-6700.

                  http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/faces/faceinfo.htm


              • Gary Null’s Natural Living

                ASTHMA

                Asthma rates increase, smoking decreases, drug use increases but doesn’t imrpove health, in
                fact, often has deleterious effects. All this and more from this site. I’ve an idea! Try eliminating
                the use of synthetic scents, then see if your asthma — or your children’s asthma — improves. — barb

                http://www.garynull.com/Documents/Iatrogenic/asthma.htm

              • Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)

                http://www.ginasthma.com/




              • GSF – National Research Center for Environment and Health

                GSF – Forschungszentrum f¸r Umwelt und Gesundheit, GmbH

                The Main Research Topics in the GSF – English

                http://www.gsf.de/gsf/englisch/main.html

                Halton Healthcare

                http://www.haltonhealthcare.com


                • Visiting Our Hospital

                  General Guidelines

                  ” …Patients, visitors and staff are asked to refrain from using perfume,

                  after-shave, cologne or other scented personal care products when in the

                  hospital, due to possible patient allergies. … “

                  http://www.haltonhealthcare.com/mvisit.php#general

                • Asthma Education Program Empowers Patients to

                  Self-Manage Their Condition

                  “Managing” your asthma by taking drugs helps the pharmaceutical industry. Real

                  management starts with prevention. One way to prevent is to give up your scented products

                  and request that your healthcare facility, workplace, school, et al. develop and enforce

                  fragrance-free policies. The air will be better for everyone. “Fragrance” on the label means

                  tens to hundreds of inadequately tested chemicals are used to concoct each single scent, which

                  in turn has not been tested for adverse events as a result of inhalation or absorption . . . and we

                  don’t have a clue about their systemic effects, either. But this article gives some info. The only trouble is, one cannot avoid fragrances used by others. — barb

                  http://www.haltonhealthcare.com/hart003.php


              • Health, Environment & WorkÝ

                “This site provides many academically based educational resources (also available as

                FAQs), a search facility, as well as vetted and updated ‘links’ relating to Occupational
                and Environmental Health and Medicine. “

                http://www.agius.com/hew/


                • Suggestions for improving Indoor Air Quality in the Office Environment
                  Two bits’ worth by barb: Use this sites search engine … e.g., you’ll find several documents
                  on pesticides, none for “fragrance,” and just this one for “perfume.” Of particular interest to me are the suggestions for the occupants.


                • Endocrine disrupters

                  http://www.agius.com/hew/resource/endodis.htm


              • How Asthma-Friendly Is Your School?

                “Asthma can be controlled; expect nothing less.”

                “2.Does the school maintain good indoor air quality? Does it reduce or eliminate allergens

                and irritants that can make asthma worse?

                  “Allergens and irritants include pets with fur or feathers, mold, dust mites (for

                  example, in carpets and upholstery), cockroaches, and strong odors or fumes

                  from such products as pesticides, paint, perfumes, and cleaning chemicals

                .”

                http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/lung/asthma/friendly.htm


              • HOW ENVIRONMENTAL AND AIR CONTAMINANTS AFFECT CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

                By S. Moser, Citizens for a Safe Learning Environment

                http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Education/CASLE/asthma.html

              • In the Air — Be Aware!

                Eva Millqvist, MD, PhD

                Doctoral thesis 1996 (Reduced version)

                http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:0krw3PfRmSIJ:www.tilia.se/books/intheairbeawareeng1.pdf+prevalence+of+asthmatics+react+to+perfume&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

                PDF: file: http://www.tilia.se/books/intheairbeawareeng1.pdf


              • Inhalation challenge effects of perfume scent strips in patients with asthma.

                Kumar P, Caradonna-Graham VM, Gupta S, Cai X, Rao PN, Thompson J.

                Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans, USA.
                “…CONCLUSIONS: Perfume-scented strips in magazines can cause exacerbations of
                symptoms and airway obstruction in asthmatic patients. Severe and atopic asthma
                increases risk of adverse respiratory reactions to perfumes.”

                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7583865&dopt=Abstract

              • Institute of Medicine (IOM)(an arm of NAS)

                Study Finds Strong Evidence That Exposure to Some Indoor Substances Can Lead to or Worsen Asthma

                “… For biologic or chemical contaminants that could worsen asthma symptoms, limited

                or suggestive evidence exists regarding exposure to material shed by domestic birds;

                certain types of pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); secondhand tobacco
                smoke in older children and adults; formaldehyde fumes from furniture and

                building materials; and fragrances in personal care and household products.

                The committee found limited evidence of an association between the development of

                asthma in infants and their exposure to RSV and material shed by cockroaches. …”

                [emphasis added]

                http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/0309064961?OpenDocument



              • Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA)

                JAMA lists perfumes at the very end of its info on Asthma, but at least it is there, under
                “Indoor / Outdoor Pollutants and Irritants.” JAMA states:
                “Other irritants

                (e.g., perfumes, cleaning agents, sprays). Now, let me tell you, when you read the word
                “irritant,” think POISON. If that definition is good enough for Oxford Dictionary, it should be
                good enough for our medical industry, our FDA, our EPA . . .

                http://web.archive.org/web/20000520083257/http://www.ama-assn.org/special/asthma/treatmnt/guide/guidelin/comp2/fig2-4.htm

              • Medical Post

                “ALLERGY UPDATE: In Brief”

                By Gillian Wansbrough

                ” While perfumes do seem to cause respiratory symptoms in asthmatics, they have less of an effect than might be expected.


                “Researchers at the Tulane University Medical Centre evaluated 77 asthmatic individuals, 77% of whom indicated they were allergic to fragrances. Of the 38 fragrances identified as causing reactions, the top six were Red, White Diamonds, Giorgio, Charlie, Opium and Poison.”

                http://www.medicalpost.com/mpcontent/article.jsp?content=/content/EXTRACT/RAWART/3612/17A.html

                  Excerpted from a letter I wrote to MedicalPost that was never answered . . . — barb






                  I had problems with how that study was performed — and wrote to both American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology when that study was released, and to Tulane.

                  In your piece, you’ve quoted:

                  “Fifteen subjects were randomly exposed for 20 minutes at a time to each of these fragrances in an inhalation chamber. Spirometry was performed during the last 10 minutes.”

                  The subjects were not only exposed for ONLY 20 minutes at a time, but then — and this is crucial information — “After each exposure, the chamber was flushed with filtered air.”

                  I ask you, in what real-life perfume exposure situation does the person suffering an adverse event as a result of the toxic chemicals volatilizing off of our modern synthetic scents get to have his/her breathing space flushed with filter air? And that is after an exposure of ONLY 20 minutes! … — barb


              • The Mickey Leland National Urban Air Toxics Research Center

                Founded 1990, Incorporated 1991

                ONGOING RESEARCH

                http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/mleland/Pages/research.htm


              • MotherNature.com on Asthma

                Fighting for Air

                http://mothernature.com/news/99_09_01/at.stm



              • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

                http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

                — end asthma —

                top of page



                Atrazine

                See EHN’s Pesticide Info and Pest Management page. Isn’t it amazing how hard we have to
                work to show the harmful effects of pesticides? The burden of proof should move from the public to
                the industry that markets these harmful toxins before they are fully substantiated for safety.
                As I see it, our planet has MCS and it is affecting all of her vital systems. — barb


                • EU Bans Toxic Atrazine Herbicide Still Widely Used in US Corn Belt

                  Pesticide Action Network via Organic Consumers Association

                  http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/atrazine102703.cfm

                • ScienceDaily

                    I wonder what harms would be found if effects of Roundup were studied? — barb

                  • Atrazine Runoff Jeopardizing Herbicide’s Use By Farmers

                    “WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. ‚ A popular herbicide is showing up in drinking water supplies, threatening its future use by Indiana farmers. …”

                    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329140114.htm

                  • Popular Weed Killer Demasculinizes Frogs, Disrupts Their Sexual Development

                    “Berkeley – The nation’s top-selling weed killer, atrazine, disrupts the sexual development
                    of frogs at concentrations 30 times lower than levels allowed by the Environmental
                    Protection Agency (EPA), raising concerns about heavy use of the herbicide on corn,
                    soybeans and other crops in the Midwest and around the world. …”

                    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020416073811.htm

                  • Popular Weed Killer Feminizes Native Leopard Frogs Across Midwest

                    “Berkeley – Native male leopard frogs throughout the nation’s Corn Belt are being
                    feminized by an herbicide, atrazine, used extensively to kill weeds on the country’s leading

                    export crops, corn and soybeans, according to a survey conducted by University of
                    California, Berkeley, biologists and reported this week in Nature. …”

                    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021031074404.htm


                ATSDR


                • ATSDR Board of Scientific Counselors

                  Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

                  Annual Report (Fiscal Year 1994)

                  Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

                  “ATSDR gave the Board an update of the agency’s activities in the area of multiple
                  chemical sensitivity. ATSDR noted that multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is an
                  increasingly used diagnosis assigned to patients with a variety of symptoms attributed
                  to various environmental chemicals.

                  “The Board considered a motion that ATSDR should take a leadership role, assuming
                  that additional monies are made available to maintain MCS as a priority area. The
                  motion was seconded. The Board discussed the role of ATSDR as being objective and
                  neutral. The leadership role of ATSDR should include supporting conferences, developing
                  questionnaires, and conducting studies. The Chair called for a vote on the motion and
                  the motion was passed.”

                  http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/bsc1994.html

                • ATSDR and The Interagency Workgroup on Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS)

                  http://web.health.gov/environment/mcs/index.htm



                top of page




                Attention Deficit Disorder

                Please see ADD above

                ehnlinx/a.htm#ADD




                Attitudinal barriers faced by the fragrance and chenical sensitized persons

                California Health and Safety Code Section 41700

                41700. Except as otherwise provided in Section 41705, no person shall discharge from
                any source whatsoever such quantities of air contaminants or other material which cause
                injury, detriment, nuisance, or annoyance to any considerable number of persons or
                to the public, or which endanger the comfort, repose, health, or safety of any such
                persons or the public, or which cause, or have a natural tendency to cause, injury or
                damage to business or property. …”


                “… 41705. (a) Section 41700 shall not apply to odors emanating from agricultural
                operations necessary for the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals.

                http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cacodes/hsc/41700-41712.html


                • Attitudes Regarding MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities)

                  by Barbara Herskovitz January 26, 1999

                  http://www.fiscorp.net/iaq/iaqapps4.html

                • Wednesday’s What’s Next?

                  Wednesday, October 16, 2002

                  “When I saw this article, I couldn’t help but think, “What’s next?” Don’t get me wrong…
                  I feel bad that the child wound up in the hospital but I think referring to perfume as a
                  “potentially deadly spray” is a bit dramatic. If you want to get technical, a pen is a
                  potentially deadly weapon, depending on how it’s used. Maybe we should ban those too?”

                  —————————————-

                  Family Wants Perfume School Ban

                  By ROGER ALFORD

                  .c The Associated Press

                  xxxxx 8 >< xxxxx

                  Posted by Renee Sylvester at 7:24 AM

                  http://reneesgraphics.blogspot.com/2002_10_13_reneesgraphics_archive.html

                Attorneys — see ADA, above, and/or law




                Aubrey Organics

                100% Natural Hair, Skin and Body Care

                http://www.aubrey-organics.com/about_company.html


              • The Auckland Allergy Clinic

                [The clinic] is committed to the provision of a high quality private sector diagnostic and
                management service for patients and referring doctors.

                http://www.allergyclinic.co.nz/

                Audubon Society


                • The Audubon Guide to Home Pesticides

                  By: Joel Bourne Icons by: Lisa Manning

                  “… Pesticides used by homeowners can wreak havoc on wildlife, even when they¼re
                  correctly applied. About a dozen pesticides approved for backyard use have caused
                  documented die-offs of birds. If mishandled, these chemicals can also be toxic to humans,
                  especially children, who might accidentally swallow them. Below is a list of some

                  of the active ingredients found in the most popular off-the-shelf pesticides. Keep in mind
                  that formulations varyãeven within one product and one brandãso be sure to read
                  the labels carefully each time you shop. (Two popular herbicides, 2,4-D and
                  glyphosate, are included, though their toxicity to birds and wildlife is considered low.)…”

                  Be careful! This site recommends using synthetic pyrethrum — that’s one of the ‘cides that

                  did me in in my former workplace! — barb

                  http://www.audubon.org/bird/pesticides/

                • Toxic Tundra: Oil Drilling in an Alaskan Wildlife Refuge Leaves a

                  Toxic Legacy of Oil Spills and Pollution

                  Audubon Society

                  http://www.audubon.org/campaign/arctic_report/toxic_drilling.html

                Australia

                Also see EHN’s MCS Links / International

                ehnlinx/mcs.htm#International

                Autism

                Is there something about shots given at about two years of age? I ask only because

                I keep seeing that kids were fine until about 18 months to two years of age. — barb


              • Automatic Fragrance/Insecticide Dispenser Units


                  #88… Automatic insecticide dispensers injure bystanders

                  The Human Ecologist

                  http://members.aol.com/heal3/page3/

                • EHN’s Alert! — Spritzing Air Polluters

                  These devices are used in public restrooms. If you encounter such a device, immediately tell the
                  store manager that these devices are damaging to health of everyone, and especially those already
                  living with respiratory distress. It’s better to remove the device than to risk a life. — barb

                  ehnhompg/alert.htm#Spritzing

                • Also see Air “Fresheners,” above

                  ehnlinx/a.htm#Fresheners

                • Bugged by Automatic Sprayers

                  Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 12, December 2000

                  “Automatic insecticide dispensers are designed to keep restaurants, schools, and

                  other public settings free from annoying and unsanitary flying insects. They may

                  also do something else: sicken at least some of the people who are exposed to the
                  insecticides that are sprayed. …”

                  http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2000/108-12/forum.html

                • Chemical Market Reporter; Nov 29, 1999

                  Fragrance Foundation and Analysts Outline Lasting Growth Strategies.

                  (Statistical Data Included); Author/s: Peter Landau

                  “… Ms. Green [Fragrance Foundation] foresees “smart homes with fragrance integrated
                  into the construction or heating and air systems” and says that air fresheners will
                  enjoy exponential growth. The candle market will be especially strong, underlining the
                  demand for environmental fragrances.

                  “MORE CLASSICS

                  “Fragrances will travel, with hotels offering aromatherapeutic-themed rooms.

                  Fragrant cars and planes will become popular, and there will also be a growing

                  demand for aromatherapy-associated travel products to relieve illnesses such as

                  jet lag. …”

                  http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m0FVP/22_256/57887294/print.jhtml

                • Illnesses Associated With Use of Automatic Insecticide Dispenser Units —

                  Selected States and United States, 1986–1999; June 09, 2000 / 49(22);492-5

                  http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4922a3.htm

                • Illnesses Associated With the Use of Automatic Insecticide

                  Dispenser Units ã California, 1995; Florida, 1999; and United States, 1986‚1999

                  http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/mmwrnews/n2k0609.htm#mmwr3

                • Illnesses Associated With Use of Automatic Insecticide Dispenser Units

                  Selected States and United States, 1986-1999 — JAMA

                  http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v284n4/ffull/jwr0726-2.html

                • Illnesses Associated With Use of Automatic Insecticide Dispenser

                  Units — Selected States and United States, 1986–1999MedScape

                  http://patient.medscape.com/govmt/CDC/MMWR/2000/06.00/mmwr4922.03/mmwr4922.03.html



            • Autonomic Nervous System


            • Avant MAGIC Awards

              Joe Montana, San Francisco 49ers Hero, to Help Avant! Foundation Launch “MAGIC”

              Program to Recognize and Reward Community Heroes

                 Prestigious Panel of Civic, Political, Business, and Academic Leaders to
              Select Winners

              http://www.avanticorp.com/Avant!/News/PressRelease/Item/0,1105,165,00.html


              AVOID Fragrances

              (Also see Fragrance-free Policies/Resolutions at

              ehnlinx/f.htm#Fragrance-free)

              These sites point to information that links fragrances and illnesses. There is

              plenty of evidence that fragrances are made with toxic chemicals about which

              the industry and the US FDA know too little. People adversely affected by

              these toxic chemicals exhibit symptoms that are typical of chemical poisoning.

              (See Julia Kendall’s work at

              ehnhompg/kendall.htm

              Betty Bridges, RN

              ehnlinx/b.htm#Betty.)

              FDA Petition — YOUR chance to tell it to the FDA!

              FDApetition/bkgrinfo.htm



              HOW and WHY to be SCENT-FREE

              http://www.disabledwomen.net/queer/scentfree.htm

              US Access Board

              (http://www.access-board.gov/)
              when you are denied access due to fragrances. Air is part of
              every building and conveyance, and it cannot be “shaken out.”

              It is time to address the acess needs and rights of the chemically

              injured/disabled. A step in the right direction was taken in July 2000

              with the Access Board’s Pollicy to Promote Fragrance-Free Environments

              and the work continues on. See




              • Addicted to fragrances? Years ago — early 90s — a co-worker said, I HAVE to wear
                perfume! You can imagine tone of voice and look upon face as that was stated. I mentioned it to
                Julia Kendall, who responded, “Oh, the poor dear is addicted to fragrances. I’m sure of it, based on

                my research!” Now we learn that Julia may have been right on with her assessment. — barb


                  PubMedQuery

                  Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1999 Apr;63(4):743-8

                  Potentiation of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by perfume and phytoncid.

                  Aoshima H, Hamamoto K

                  Department of Physics, Biology and Informatics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Japan.
                  aoshima@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

                  “… these results suggest the possibility that the intake of perfume or phytoncid

                  through the lungs, the skin or the intestines modulates the neural transmission in the
                  brain through ionotropic GABAA receptors and changes the frame of the human

                  mind, as alcohol or tobacco does.”

                  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10361687&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b




              • AEHA – Allergy and Environmental Health Association: Ottawa Branch

                http://www.schoolnet.ca/sne/e/NCCS/members.htm

              • Air Fresheners can cause ear aches …



              • ALERT to PREGNANT WOMEN and NEW MOMS and DADS


                • Association of Birth Defect Children

                  http://www.birthdefects.org/



                  • E-News Special Alert

                    February 28, 2000

                    A reporter with a major national news magazine recently contacted
                    the ABDC. He is working on a story about neurobehavioral birth
                    defects that may be linked to toxic environmental exposures during
                    pregnancy. Neurobehavioral birth defects include learning
                    disabilities, attention problems, autism and PDD as well as
                    behavioral and emotional disorders during childhood.

                    If you have a child with a neurobehavioral birth defect that you
                    believe was linked to a toxic environmental exposure during your
                    pregnancy and you would be interested in being interviewed for this
                    story, send an e-mail to Betty Mekdeci

                    betty@birthdefects.org .
                    Please describe your child’s problems and the type of
                    environmental exposures you had during your pregnancy.

                    This is a very important story that can raise awareness about the
                    link between toxics in our environment and the increasing number of
                    children being born today with neurobehavioral problems.

                    Thank you,

                    Betty Mekdeci

                    Executive Director

                    Assn. of Birth Defect Children

                  • ALA’s New Tip Sheet – Y2002: Asthma – Limit Exposure to Triggers

                    Fifth on the list . . . I’d make this FIRST! . . . “Household irritants, including dust, cleaning
                    products, and perfume” AND, I would add PESTICIDES. Remember they are also scented. — barb

                    http://www.lungusa.org/asthma/atipsheet.html

                  • Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1999 Apr;63(4):743-8

                    Potentiation of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by perfume and phytoncid.

                    Aoshima H, Hamamoto K

                    Department of Physics, Biology and Informatics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Japan.

                    aoshima@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

                    “…these results suggest the possibility that the intake of perfume or phytoncid through
                    the lungs, the skin or the intestines modulates the neural transmission in the brain
                    through ionotropic GABAA receptors and changes the frame of the human mind, as
                    alcohol or tobacco does.
                    ” (Thanks to Betty Bridges, RN for ferreting out this info! — barb)

                    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10361687&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


                  • Breast-feeding mothers

                    “According to a recent opinion of the Swiss professor and pediatrician Ottmar T–nz,

                    breastfeeding mothers and women should boycott scented laundry-detergents. It ist

                    known from general medicine, that todays common mixture of scents can be (partly)

                    responsible for any symptom of illness:

                    http://www.tox-doc.com/englisch/duft.htm

                  • ChemTox

                  • Chronic Illness During Pregnancy – Asthma

                    InteliHealth – Harvard Medical School

                    http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/3460/7024/31516.html?d=dmtJHE

                  • Coumarin …a fragrance chemical, a rodentcide, an anticoagulant,

                    which can cause fetal coumarin syndrome. See EHN’s

                    What I’m trying to learn is if fetal coumarin syndrome is found in cases where the

                    mother used perfumes but was not on Coumarin as an anticoagulant. I’ve yet to

                    receive a response to my various queries. — barb

                    ehnlinx/c.htm#Coumarin


                    Feingold – Details of the Feingold Program

                    ” … Perfume:

                    “Avoid anything — food, toiletries, cleaning supplies, art supplies — that has perfume
                    or fragrance (synthetic fragrance may contain one of the prohibited chemicals, and
                    natural fragrance may contain a salicylate. Use only unscented products at first) … “

                    http://www.feingold.org/programdetails.html

                  • The Good Scents Company

                    http://www.execpc.com/~goodscnt/misc/safety.html


                  • “Natural fragrances `can put pregnant women at risk'”

                    HONGKONG STANDARD ( Hong Kong Standard ) Lilian Kwok; 04-18-2000

                    (Note: pay service. Excerpted:)

                    “THE Consumer Council has called for a warning to be carried on the
                    packaging of some fragrance products after they were found to
                    contain ingredients that are potentially harmful to pregnant women
                    and unborn children.

                    “The council also found that two of the products contained the
                    cancer-causing agent benzene, although the quantity found was within
                    accepted safety levels.

                    “The findings arise from a test of 66 products, across 18 brands,
                    that are extracted from flowers, leaves, fruit seeds or wood and
                    marketed for the enhancement of health through inhalation, baths,
                    massage and skin application. . . . “

                    http://www.elibrary.com/getdoc.cgi?id=164098190x127y56877w0&OIDS=0Q001D003&Form=RL&pubname=Hong_Kong_Standard&puburl=http~C~~S~~S~www.fdch.com&querydocid=1362237@library_q&dtype=0~0&dinst=0

                  • Perfume and Frangrance Exposure During Pregnancy

                    Links to Learning Disabilities, ADD and Behavior Disorders

                    http://www.chem-tox.com/pregnancy/perfume.htm

                  • Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Agents of Subtle Change?

                    Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 107, Supplement 6, December 1999

                    http://www.ameliaww.com/fpin/ProductsEnv.htm

                  • Pollutants can reach babies in the womb

                    by Anita Manning; from Safe2Use

                    http://www.safe2use.com/ca-ipm/00-03-30c.htm


                  • Scientific advances offer new findings for assessing

                    birth defects caused by toxic chemicals, says report

                    Scroll about 2/3 way down. — barb

                    http://ace.orst.edu/info/extoxnet/newsletters/ucd2000/nltrjuly00.htm#Sci


                  • Toxicologic evidence of developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals.

                    Andersen HR, Nielsen JB, Grandjean P ; Department of Environmental Medicine,

                    Odense University, Winslowparken 17, DK-5000, Odense, Denmark.

                    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10781879&dopt=Abstract



              • Asthma, migraines, sinusitis, rhinitis, … trigger acknowledged by:


                • Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Online

                  “What triggers vasomotor rhinitis?

                  “Irritants that can trigger vasomotor rhinitis include cigarette smoke, strong odors and
                  fumes including perfume, hair spray, other cosmetics, laundry detergents, cleaning
                  solutions, … “

                  http://allergy.mcg.edu/Advice/rhin.html

                • American Academy of Environmental Medicine

                  http://www.healthy.net/pan/pa/NaturalTherapies/aaem/index.html




                • American Academy of Neurology

                  http://www.aan.com/

                • American Lung Association (ALA)



                • American Medical Association (AMA)

                  from: Figure 2-4. Summary of Control Measures for Environmental Factors That Can Make Asthma Worse



                  • Indoor/Outdoor Pollutants and Irritants: Discuss ways to reduce exposures to the following:

                      Wood-burning stoves or fireplaces

                      Unvented stoves or heaters

                      Other irritants (e.g., perfumes, cleaning agents, sprays)




                • Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

                  Search for the word “Perfume” — barb

                  http://www.aafa.org/




                • Asthma in America – Background

                  “What causes asthma symptoms and attacks?

                  “… Irritants in the air, including smoke from tobacco, wood fires or charcoal grills,
                  as well as strong fumes or odors like household sprays, paint, gasoline, perfume and
                  scented soaps
                  . [Emphasis added.]

                  http://www.asthmainamerica.com/bkgrd.htm

                • ASTHMA IN CALIFORNIA: Laying the Foundation for a Statewide Strategy

                  by Richard Kreutzer, Michael Lipsett, Julie Von Behren, and Eileen Yamada

                  “Asthma policy should be driven by a vision with two goals. The long-term goal should
                  be reduction in the prevalence of asthma, and ultimately perhaps its eradication.

                  The shorter-term goal should be the appropriate transfer and application of current

                  knowledge to reduce morbidity among people with asthma.”

                  Yeah, sure. Start seriously educating people to remove superfluous toxins from their lives,
                  such as synthetic fragrances in personal care, and household and janitorial cleaning and
                  maintenance products. Then let’s see if there is a remarkable drop in asthma. Until our
                  “experts” look also at chemical induced asthma, I’m afraid our rates will continue to skyrocket. — barb

                  http://www.ucop.edu/cprc/asthma.html

                • Asthma, The Segal Guide to



                • Enviro Health Environmental Home Inspections

                  envirohomeinfo@mindspring.com

                  717-583-4155 – voice mail

                  Field offices: CT, MA, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA, WV

                  http://www.create-your-healthy-home.com/table.htm


                • Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Information

                  click on Asthma Zone

                  http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH?t=408&st=408&r=WSIHW000




                • Institute of Medicine (IOM)(an arm of NAS)

                  Study Finds Strong Evidence That Exposure to Some Indoor Substances Can Lead to or Worsen Asthma

                  “… For biologic or chemical contaminants that could worsen asthma symptoms, limited

                  or suggestive evidence exists regarding exposure to material shed by domestic birds;

                  certain types of pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); secondhand tobacco
                  smoke in older children and adults; formaldehyde fumes from furniture and

                  building materials; and fragrances in personal care and household products.

                  The committee found limited evidence of an association between the development of

                  asthma in infants and their exposure to RSV and material shed
                  by cockroaches. …”

                  [emphasis added]

                  http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/0309064961?OpenDocument



                  Kaiser Permanente

                  http://www.kp.org/


                • Mayo Clinic

                  http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/common/htm/index.htm




                • Medscape

                  http://www.medscape.com/


                  • Common Fragrance Ingredients May Provoke Hornet Attack

                    “NEW YORK (Reuters Health) Aug 06 – Chemicals that are commonly used in

                    fragrances and food flavorings may incite a hornet attack, according to a brief

                    report published in the August 7th issue of Nature.


                    “The problem is that in addition to their commercial use, these chemicals are also

                    found in the venom of hornets. When threatened, a hornet releases this venom,

                    and these chemicals appear to act like a pheromone, provoking alarm and defensive

                    behavior among nearby hornets. …”

                    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/459721

                  • Occupational Acute Anaphylactic Reaction to Assault by Perfume Spray in the Face

                    from Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

                    James E. Lessenger, MD, private practice

                    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/405841

                  • Atopic Dermatitis: Taming “The Itch That Rashes”

                    Ronald C. Hansen, MD

                    “…Caution parents not to use preparations with a fragrance, which can irritate the skin. …”

                    This is the only reference to fragrance . . . again, with only the look at the primary user.

                    When will dermatologists start looking at fragrances as volatile organic compounds capable

                    of adversely affecting the skin (and other body organs) of people other than the wearers?

                    And with that caution to not use “preparations with fragrance” should come a broader
                    explanation that fragrances are nearly ubiquitous but there are products that are petrochemical
                    free for laundry as in one can use baking soda or products like Seventh Generation and Ecover,
                    one does not have to use fabric softners as one can use vinegar quite effectively, etc. And for
                    heavens sake, don’t buy scented anything for baby. The word “fragrance” on the label may
                    conjure up gardens of flowers for you, but in reality, you are putting unkown and inadequately
                    tested combinations of tens to hundreds of chemicals on your infant and child — on yourself,
                    as well. You have the industry’s assurances that their products are “thoroughly tested” but
                    you must take that on blind faith. There is only government overlook, there is no effective
                    government oversight! For more information, visit the FDA Citizens’ Petition, Docket Number
                    99P-1340 at http://www.ehnca.org/FDApetition/bkgrinfo.htm— barb

                    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/459024_print


                • Migraine Resource Center

                  http://www.imitrex.com/welcome.html


                    Unfortunately, Imitrex has taken off these sheets — or at least I have not been able to
                    find them even after registering for use of their resource library. It seems to me that they

                    are just interested in pushing drugs. They don’t even give you a chance to choose

                    alternative treatments such as chiropractic or acupuncture … and they sure as heck don’t
                    suggest that you — or others around you — give up scented products as a means of prevention.
                    Of course, if you prevented your migraines, you’d not have to buy Imitrex. — barb; 9/00

                  • Triggers – no longer available

                    http://www.imitrex.com/what/triggers/index.html

                  • Smells/Odors – no longer available

                    http://www.imitrex.com/what/triggers/smells.html#1



                • National Asthma Education Program

                  ” …Strong Odors and Sprays


                    “* Do not stay in your home when it is being painted. Allow

                    enough time for the paint to dry.

                    “* Avoid perfume and perfumed cosmetics such as talcum

                    powder and hairspray.

                    “* Do not use room deodorizers.

                    “* Use nonperfumed household cleaning products whenever

                    possible. …

                  http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/astpreg.txt


                • NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH


                  • Management of Asthma During Pregnancy

                    NIH Publication No. 93-3279

                    September 1993

                    “How To Control Asthma Triggers …”

                    “Strong Odors and Sprays


                    • Do not stay in your home when it is being painted. Allow

                      enough time for the paint to dry.

                    • Avoid perfume and perfumed cosmetics such as talcum

                      powder and hairspray.

                    • Do not use room deodorizers.


                    • Use nonperfumed household cleaning products whenever

                      possible. …”

                    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/astpreg.txt

                  • Your asthma can be controlled, Expect nothing less

                    NIH Publication No. 91-2664 – September 1991

                    Learn What Things Start Your Asthma Symptoms and Control Them

                    “Strong odors from perfumes, paints, sprays, or other items”

                    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/lung/asthma/asthma.htm



                • Practical Guide for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma

                  National Institutes of Health: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

                  (On electronic page 49 of this 60 page PDF file, you’ll see they tell you to “try to stay away

                  from perfume.” How praytell the way those chemicals waft, permeate, remain for days? — barb)

                  “Smoke, Strong Odors, and Sprays

                  * If possible, do not use a wood-burning stove, kerosene heater, or fireplace.

                  * Try to stay away from strong odors and sprays, such as perfume,
                  talcum powder, hair spray, and paints.

                  http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/practgde/practgde.pdf



                • Sinusitis: A Treatment Plan That Works for asthma and allergies too

                  Wellington S. Tichenor, M.D.; New York, New York

                  http://www.sinuses.com/index.htm






              • Neways: Avoid These Potentially Harmful Incredients …

                http://www.indneways.com/creativenv/avoid.htm



                “Sub fertile couples”

                SOME THOUGHTS ON THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF FRAGRANCES ON HUMANS

                By Martin Watt

                Extracted from a lecture given to the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, UK.

              • What Goes On the Skin, Goes Through the Skin

                By Richard H. Conrad, PhD, Biochemist

                FDApetition/lrconrad.htm




              — end AVOID fragrances section —



            • Avoidable Toxins

              http://theanswertocancer.com/avoidable_toxins.htm



              Awareness2000

  • 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading...

    2 Comments »

    • Lauryn Fransisco said:

      Not to hijack this thread, but I’m looking for an attorney in clovis and I don’t know how to find them has anyone heard of this clovis attorney? Its located in Clovis, close to my home I can’t find reviews on them — Clovis Attorneys, 403 Woodwroth Ave, Clovis, CA – (559) 492-6529

    • Peinture Acrylique said:

      Wow, amazing list! The least we can say is that it’s a really complete list! It must have taken you A LONG time to gather all of this. And we’re only on letter A! 🙂 Congratulations and thanks for the ressources.

    Leave a comment!

    Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

    Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

    You can use these tags:
    <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

    This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.